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01.26.09

The Future of Hollywood

The Internet has already changed the way the way movies are made, viewed, and distributed. But is the film industry — or the audience— ready to face what technology can actually do? Sharon Waxman, founder of thewrap.com, focuses on Hollywood's next act as TheWrap launches today.

The Internet has already changed the way the way movies are made, viewed, and distributed. But is the film industry —or the audience— ready to face what technology can actually do? Sharon Waxman, founder of thewrap.com, focuses on Hollywood's next act as TheWrap launches today.

The ground has shifted beneath the foundations of what—for the better part of a century—have been America's most reliable and desirable products: movies and television shows.

Then this thing called the Internet came along. Now anyone, anywhere in the industry will tell you this: Hollywood must adapt in order to survive.

"People truly do not understand the extent to which new media is not a business," said Marshall Herskovitz, "It's remarkably not a business. I'm speaking from painful experience."

But how?

"People truly do not understand the extent to which new media is not a business," said Marshall Herskovitz, the veteran television producer who last year declared his independence from the networks and created "quarterlife," a web series and social media hub. "It's remarkably not a business. I'm speaking from painful experience."

Read the full story at thewrap.com.

Sharon Waxman is the author of the recently-released books Loot and Loot: The Battle Over the Stolen Treasures of the Ancient World, an award-winning journalist, and a former correspondent for The New York Times. Waxman is the founder and editor-in-chief of TheWrap.com, an entertainment and media industry news and opinion site.