Reader Responses

10.10.12

Defining the Real Obama, Ctd.

Here's some reader thoughts on what a second Obama term would look like:

"Practical Girl:"

Second term, much like the first term without the need to continuously clean up after brink-of-financial-disaster. We'll continue to see the same thoughtful, methodical approach to economic recovery. We'll see an adherence to the hallmark of the Obama administration's foreign policy: Think first, invade last.

Energy policy- the oil and gas booms will continue, but without approval of the Canadian pipeline. And alternative energy plans and funding will be kicked into high gear. I also expect a second Obama term to begin to seriously consider the vulnerabilities that lie within the US telecom industry. More funding will go to US companies poised for huge growth in this area, and President Obama will have bipartisan support in this. It's possible that it will be his biggest "win" of his career, next to health care.

Mostly, though, President Obama will take on his second term sans a Congress that can afford to do nothing but obstruct. With President Obama back in the White House, Republicans on the Hill will be forced to act, at least a little bit, like statesman. Otherwise, they risk going back to their districts in '14 or states in '16, asking for their jobs back while at the same time trying to explain why they're necessary to growth when it's happened without them.

"Easton" thinks consolidation would define the term.

The PPACA would become settled law, Dodd-Frank, while it might have a few minor revisions, will solidify the banking sector, the housing market will begin to bounce back and with it the economy.

And he is likely to exchange one conservative for a liberal on the Supreme Court.

As to the budget, with the Bush tax cuts due to expire he doesn't have to do anything to defeat the Republicans so he already has all the leverage he needs to prevent protracted budget negotiations.

And "balconesfault" thinks a lot depends on the House:

If the GOP still holds the House, we'll basically be in stasis for another 2 years at least, as Boehner, Ryan, and McCarthy block any progressive policy moves.

If the Dems take back the House, I think we'll see another push for climate change legislation, since the screws from the EPA-mandated CO2 regs on industry will be getting tighter and there will be a push to supercede those with Cap and Trade or a Carbon Tax that provide more flexibility.

On healthcare, we may get to see a renewed push for a Public Option - particularly with so many Red State Governors deciding to screw their populace and not create their own state compact, out of spite. As non-crazy-governor states start implementing their state insurance compacts, and the benefits to small businesses and individuals from dealing with these compacts becomes more evident, the Feds will have to pick up the slack for the crazy-governor-states which will create a natural pathway to the Public Option.

There will be a "grand bargain" on the budget regardless of the outcome in the House. I think there will be some kind of "grand bargain" no matter who gets elected President.

The question people have to ask - would you rather have the "grand bargain" be negotiated by a President who deep down believes that 47% of the population are leeches that suck the lifeblood out of the "makers"?

What do you think? If you agree, disagree, or just think I'm a fool, let's hear it.