1. Censorship

    New Huck Finn Cuts 'N' Word

    A new edition of Mark Twain's classic novel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, will censor the "n" word by replacing it with the word "slave." The revision was spearheaded by Twain scholar Alan Gribben who, along with publisher NewSouth Books, plans to release the book in a single volume along with companion piece The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, without the controversial language since the novel has been slowly disappearing from grade school curricula across the country due to the repeated use of the "n" word. "This is not an effort to render Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn colorblind," said Gribben, speaking from his office at Auburn University. "Race matters in these books. It's a matter of how you express that in the 21st century." The decision has left people strongly divided, with purists of the novel against the censorship. The racial slur appears a total of 219 times in the book.

    Read it at Publisher's Weekly