1. HACKING

    Sen. Rockefeller: Investigate Murdoch

    News Corp Chief Rupert Murdoch (L) is driven away from the High Court in central London on April 26, 2012 after Rupert Murdoch's second and final day of giving evidence at the Leveson Inquiry. Rupert Murdoch admitted on April 26 there was a "cover-up" over phone hacking at Britain's News of the World tabloid but tried to shift the blame away from himself and senior executives at his media empire.  AFP PHOTO / JUSTIN TALLIS        (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/GettyImages)

    Justin Tallis, AFP / Getty Images

    Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-WV) asked the British committee investigating News Corp. to look into whether the company had broken any American laws. Murdoch was censured earlier in the week by the British Parliament and declared not “fit and proper” to run News Corp. If the Leveson Committee decides to pursue Rockefeller’s inquiry, made via a letter, it could lead to a Senate investigation—which would probably have implications for Murdoch’s American holdings, such as Fox News. Meanwhile, former News of the World editor Andy Coulson—who later went on to work for Prime Minister David Cameron—and former News International Chief Executive Rebekah Brooks have been called to testify in front of the Leveson Committee next week.

    Read it at The Daily Beast