Delectable Art

Frieze Art Fair 2014 Is All About the Food

One of the most fun contemporary art fairs is back, but art isn't the only thing on display this year. Some of the most sought after NYC restaurants are cooking up their tastiest creations.

Reynolds Avlon/The Daily Beast

Reynolds Avlon/The Daily Beast

The Frieze Art Fair is back in New York for the third year in a row, taking the city's art scene by storm in the hopes of creating "the ultimate art fair experience." It's no surprise then that together under a magnificent serpentine tent of "the most exciting contemporary galleries from around the globe," you will not only find some of the world's best art but also some of New York City's best and most sought-after food. Feeling inspired? Hungry? We've done the leg work for you to present the best food and art pairings from the event, starting with a chilled slice of the one and only "Crack Pie" from two-Michelin starred chef David Chang's Momofuku empire. Enojy the addictive dessert while checking out "A Certain Framework #1 (wood)," by european artist Su-Mei Tse.

Roberta's, Brooklyn

Pizza-making is an art in and of itself, and Roberta's is one of the most legendary pie places out there right now. Can't get a table at the divey brick-and-mortar location deep in the shadows of Brooklyn? Neither can we. Luckily two wood ovens await you, where pies like the "Bee Sting" and the "Def Aleppo" are being fired to order. After you've had your fill of gooey mozzarella atop a delightfully charred crust, soaked with Roberta's classic red sauce head over to Rivane Neuenschwander's "Firmamento," which is appropriatey constructed from wood, tomatoes, and tomato seeds.

Reynolds Avlon/The Daily Beast

Mission Cantina, New York City & Los Angeles

If you haven't heard of Danny Bowien and the message he's preaching via some of the best and hippest Chinese and Mexican fare around, you probably will soon. From L.A. to New York City, the South Korean chef has officially conquered both culinary coasts. For those not afraid to roll up their designer sleeves, a mega-burrito filled with the likes of succulent lamb or tangy carnitas will make the trek to Randall's Island more than worth it. Filled with all the usual suspects (pinto beans, melted cheese, etc) and sauced with your choice of red or green salsa, Bowien's burritos do not disappoint (warning: or leave room for dessert). Walk it off and find prominent German painter Günther Förg’s "Untitled (acrylic and oil on canvas)."

Reynolds Avlon/The Daily Beast

Frankies Sputino, New York City & Brooklyn

Playboy magazine will tell you that Frankies Sputino serves both "rock stars and regulars," and the same can be said of their full-service, pop-up restaurant here at the art fair. The menu "features classic Italian recipes, sourcing organic products from local providers, plus a wine list featuring small producers from Italy and beyond." Sold? If you haven't spent all your money on a piece of art work like this one from Helen Marten, titled "Traditional teachers of English grammer (powder coated laser cut steel, car keys, bells, forged and welded rebar)," then book a table and feast on some self-described deceptively simple Italian. Buon appetito!

Reynolds Avlon/The Daily Beast

The Fat Radish, New York City

The Frieze's boutique food court also includes one of New York City's favorite go-to weekend spots: The Fat Radish, a cozy downtown eatery. You can nosh on the Brussels sprout salad of pecorino, golden raisins, and white balsamic without having to fight off the usual ravenous brunch rush. For some additional green inspiration head over to David Schnells's lush painting, "Bruch (oil on canvas)."

Reynolds Avlon/The Daily Beast

The Fat Radish, New York City

Brussels sprouts not your thing? Fear not - The Fat Radish's simple, seasonal salad of cumin-roasted eggplant and chickpeas, roasted peppers, and lemon is yours for the taking. As The New York Times notes of this hip spot, "almost everyone’s attractive," and the same can be said about the beautiful people power-lunching on scene at this high-end salad bar of sorts. Still hungry? There's some serious food for the soul to be found in the work of Mexican conceptual artist Abraham Cruzvillegas, dubbed the 21st-century equivalent of Marcel Duchamp. Our recommendation? The vibrant work titled "Blind Self-Portrait."

Reynolds Avlon/The Daily Beast

Court Street Grocers, New York City & Brooklyn

With "over 190 of the world's leading contemporary galleries" to explore at the event, it's no wonder so much thought has gone into the sustenance on site. Court Street Grocers is a one-stop shop for a little bit of everything, and a whole lot more. A must-order is the Itlalian combo: crusty Sullivan Street strecci bread topped with layers of mortadella, salami, hot coppa, swiss, mozzarella, pecorino romano, arugula, red onion, mayo, "CSG" hoagie spread, and red wine vinaigrette. Those in need of a lighter alternative will find refuge in the grain salad: farro, barley, quinoa, chevril, parsley, chive, carrot, and miso. Either option goes perfectly with a pint of their "Other Half" Brooklyn brew. Once you have fueled up sufficiently head over to Janice Kerbal's "A sure-fire recipe for drama."

Reynolds Avlon/The Daily Beast

Furanku

The new kid on the block this year is Furanku, offering sushi, saki, and juice at a 50-seat omakase bar. The Frieze Art Fair takes pride in curating some of the best-known international galleries for this event and the cuisine offered is just as far-reaching. Fresh sashimi of tuna, salmon, and yellowtail are served alongside classic spicy tuna and dragon rolls. Just like artists, sushi chefs are masters of craft and churn out plate after plate of perfectly executed sushi at this pop-up. One quick look at "The Instant," colored Indian ink on Japanese paper (mounted on aluminum), from artist José Maria Sicilia immediately conjures visions of the vibrant ingredients found at the core of Japanese food.