Open the Doors

House & Home at the National Building Museum in D.C.

America’s households have never had their doors open wider than at House & Home, an exhibition opening April 29 at the National Building Museum in Washington D.C. The show aims to narrate the history of the American home, and promises a direct and engaging layout spanning seven galleries. One room will be piled high with household goods, another lined with touchable building materials, and yet another will display scale models of iconic homes. Some elements shall be arranged chronologically, demonstrating to viewers the many changes, and occasional continuities, seen in our homes over time. The show runs through May 1, 2017.

Model by Studios Eichbaum + Arnold, 2010. Photo by Museum staff.

Corbis

America’s households have never had their doors open wider than at House & Home, an exhibition opening April 29 at the National Building Museum in Washington D.C. The show aims to narrate the history of the American home, and promises a direct and engaging layout spanning seven galleries. One room will be piled high with household goods, another lined with touchable building materials, and yet another will display scale models of iconic homes. Some elements shall be arranged chronologically, demonstrating to viewers the many changes, and occasional continuities, seen in our homes over time. The show runs through May 1, 2017.

By Rachel Small.

Model by Studios Eichbaum + Arnold, 2010. Photo by Museum staff.

Vizcaya, Miami, Florida. Architect: F. Burrall Hoffman. Built: 1916.

© 2012 National Building Museum, Photo by Allan Sprecher.

Installation photo showing some of the life-size, touchable wall sections from House & Home.

Model by Studios Eichbaum + Arnold, 2008. Photo by Museum staff.

Monticello, Charlottesville, Virginia. Built by Thomas Jefferson, 1769-1826.

Ariel Efron, Local Projects.

Flatpak House, Callicoon, New York. Architect: Lazor Office.

Model by Studios Eichbaum + Arnold, 2010. Photo by Museum staff.

Fallingwater, Mill Run, Pennsylvania. Architect: Frank Lloyd Wright. Built: 1935.

Photo by Addison N. Scurlock; Scurlock Studio Records, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Behring Center, Smithsonian Institution.

Julia Brooks’ Wedding, Washington, D.C., 1947.

Photo by Maynard L. Parker; The Huntington Library, San Marino, California.

Family barbecue in Lakewood Plaza suburban development, Long Beach, California,ca. 1950. Architect: Chris Choate with designer Cliff May.

Photo by Jack E. Boucher; Library of Congress, Historic American Buildings Survey.

Carson House, Eureka, California, 1960. Architect: Samuel Newsom. Built: 1884-1886.

Photo by William Henry Jackson; The National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution.

Ten men building a wood frame house, Omaha Reservation, Nebraska, 1877.