United Front

Scenes From America’s Growing Pipeline Protests (PHOTOS)

From hundreds of Native American tribes to Hollywood stars and other activists, protesters are uniting in increasing numbers against Dakota Access and other pipelines.

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Activists celebrate at Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on Dec. 4 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. The Army Corps of Engineers told Standing Rock Sioux Chairman Dave Archambault on Sunday that the current route for the Dakota Access pipeline will be denied.

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An Native American activist rides down fom a ridge that overlooks Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on Dec. 4.

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Activists celebrate at Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on Dec. 4.

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Activists hold hands during a prayer circle as they try to surround the entire camp at Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on Dec. 4.

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U.S. Navy deep sea diving veteran Rob McHaney holds an American flag as he leads a group of veteran activists back from a police barricade on a bridge near Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on Dec. 4.

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Activists and veterans hold hands as they move a crowd back from a police barricade on a bridge near Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on Dec. 4.

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Chief Lance King of the Ogalala Lakota from Pine Ridge Reservation wears his Wa Pah Ha bonnet made from eagle feathers and rabbit skins at Oceti Sakowin Camp on December 3, 2016. He says that the presence of the Wa Pah Ha is to give the people inspiration to enforce their strength their faith, their belief so that whatever situation they are in it will enhance them to give them more strength so they can continue the message to the outside world.

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A Native American activist on horseback patrols the borders of Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on Dec. 3.

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U.S. Army veteran Zhooniya Ogitchida spray-paints a sign for the veterans headquarters tent at the Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on Dec. 3.

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Flags flap in the wind on the main thoroughfare of Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on Dec. 3.

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Activist Pete Sands of the Navajo Nation stands at a rope and looks out over an area set as a border line where the police guard a bridge near Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on Dec. 3.

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CJ Brafford, Oglala Sioux from the Pine Ridge Reservation, pulls a sheet of cookies out of the oven in the Oglala Sioux kitchen in an encampment during a protest against plans to pass the Dakota Access pipeline on Nov. 20.

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A man from the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe with a Native American tattoo on his face poses for a photograph during a protest against plans to pass the Dakota Access pipeline near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation on Nov. 16.

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A line of police moves toward a roadblock and encampment of Native American and environmental protesters near an oil pipeline construction site near the town of Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on Oct. 27.

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Protesters against the Dakota Access Pipeline stand off with police in this aerial photo of Highway 1806 and County Road 134 near the town of Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on Oct. 27.

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Chief Arvol Looking Horse, spiritual leader of the Sioux Nation, leads his people to peacefully pray near a law enforcement barricade just outside a Dakota Access Pipeline construction site north of Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on Oct. 29.

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New Yorkers rally to demand action from Sen. Charles Schumer to stop the construction of Spectra Energy’s high-pressure, fracked-gas AIM pipeline, which runs through New York state about 36 miles north of Manhattan, and is located 105 feet from the aging Indian Point nuclear power plant. Two hundred and fifty people gathered outside Schumer’s offices in Manhattan and heard from health professionals, indigenous leaders, and residents of the Hudson Valley, where the pipeline is being built. Fifteen people were arrested after refusing to leave unless Schumer took action in an act of nonviolent civil disobedience.

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Four activists were arrested Oct. 27 as they sat in prayer for the hundreds of tribes and thousands of water protectors who have been resisting pipeline construction. Activists with Food & Water Watch, New Jersey Industrial Union Council, and the Green Party of New Jersey entered the corporate headquarters of TD Bank in Mount Laurel for a demonstration calling on CEO Mike Pedersen to withdraw the bank’s financial support of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The action targeting TD Bank was carried out in solidarity with the hundreds of tribes and thousands of water protectors taking peaceful, nonviolent direct action to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline.

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Protesters demonstrate against the Energy Transfer Partners’ Dakota Access oil pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation, in Los Angeles on Sept. 13.

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Actor Shailene Woodley stands with Native Americans on stage during a climate change rally in solidarity with protests of the pipeline in North Dakota at MacArthur Park in Los Angeles on Oct. 23. Woodley was arrested earlier in October during a Dakota Access protest in North Dakota.

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Dakota Access Pipeline protesters inspect charred vehicles and signs in front of a law enforcement barricade near the pipeline construction site north of Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on Oct. 29.

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Protesters against the Dakota Access Pipeline stand off with police in this aerial photo of Highway 1806 and County Road 134 near the town of Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on Oct. 27.

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Dakota Access Pipeline protesters, L-R: Nero St. Ciaran, Lamar Armstrong, and Damon McCullough converse as they warm up near the fire in their camp at the Oceti Sakowin campground near the town of Cannon Ball, North Dakota, on Oct. 30.