Images of Climate Change from Around the World

The United Nations secretary-general shares his take on a stunning photo gallery that documents how warming temperatures are changing the planet.

Michael Hall

Michael Hall

Photographer Michael Hall decided to turn his lens on the effects of global warming after a brush with death. Hall was run over by an 18-wheeler and nearly killed while bicycling. After he recovered the ability to walk, Hall traveled around Australia to document the effects of a blistering drought on the nation caused mostly by global warming. “I'm taking very beautiful imagery of quite a tragic subject,” Hall told The Daily Beast of his photos, which document the shocking effects of global warming across the globe. Here, high tension power cables snake above an apparently pristine environment in Háifoss, Iceland.


Read United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon's commentary on the Hall photos.

Michael Hall

Australia is the driest habitable continent, and has been among the first to feel the impact of climate change on its natural drought cycle. Here, cracked mud supports a few dead trees in Lake Hume, Australia.

Michael Hall

Cattle stand in cracked grazing pastures in the Northern Territory of Australia. Hall is interested in beef consumption’s effect on the environment and climate change, and wants to organize a trip to Brazil to photograph where forests have been clear-cut for grazing purposes. Hall has spent the past two years funding his own climate change photography project, and is now seeking outside funding to further the project. He hopes sales of his book, Tragic Beauty, will enable him to keep documenting climate change. To buy the book, visit Hall's web site.

Michael Hall

Melting glaciers in Jökulsárlón, Iceland. Hall wants to travel to Antarctica and Patagonia to photograph the ice melt there in the second phase of his project.

Michael Hall

A second power station is planned near this one in New South Wales, Australia at Mt Piper. Australia exports more coal than any other nation and burns more coal per person than other nation.

Michael Hall

Toora Wind Farm energy, shown here in Victoria, Australia, could cut greenhouse gas emissions by 52,910 tons a year. Hall photographs the causes, effects, and possible solutions to global warming. He is also interested in photographing new carbon-neutral communities in China, and solar energy in Spain and the Mojave desert.

Michael Hall

Slime covered water lies at the base of the 279-foot dam wall–taller than a 25 storey building—in Wyangala Dam, Australia.

Michael Hall

Striated ice in Jökulsárlón, Iceland, which emerged after the retreat of the Vatnajökull glacier.

Michael Hall

Loy Ang Power Station in Latrobe Valley, Australia emits 15.9 million tons of greenhouse gases each year.

Michael Hall

Another power station in the Latrobe Valley is a major brown coal reserve. Hall wants to photograph coal power stations in China and the U.S. as well.

Michael Hall

Hall traveled to Anti Atlas, Morocco, another drought-stricken area. Temperatures in Morocco could rise 1.5 to 2.5 °C above current levels from 2021 to 2050.

Michael Hall

Queuing for coal off Newcastle, Australia, the MV Pasha Bulka ran aground during a severe storm.

Michael Hall

This aging, 240 megawatt power station in Augusta is one of the dirtiest in Australia. Hall says awareness about climate change is greater in Australia than many countries because of the drought, but he hopes to bring awareness to other parts of the world through a series of traveling exhibits of his photos.

Michael Hall

The $7.2 billion Moomba resources project in South Australia is fed by 536 gas and 177 oil wells.

Michael Hall

Studies show Morocco will be among countries most threatened by global warming.

Michael Hall

A convict, enlisted to fight the scrub fires on the high Sierra in California, stands exhausted.

Michael Hall

Hall traveled around Australia to document the effects of severe forest fires, like this one in New South Wales. Bush fires in Australia are becoming more prevalent and severe as drought persists.

Michael Hall

A funereal avenue of trees testifies to the intensity of the 2009 fire storm in Victoria, Australia, which Hall called “catastrophic.” It resulted in the most loss of life than any other forest fire in Australia.