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OMG, I Want This House: Esher

A minimalist haven outside London? We’ll take it. Take a look inside Esher’s Homewood House.

Tim Beddow/Interior Archive

Tim Beddow/Interior Archive

Called the Homewood House, this modernist 20th-century property was designed and landscaped by renowned architect Patrick Gwynne in 1938, when he was a mere 24 years of age. He later moved into the residence and continued to renovate it throughout his lifetime. Located just outside London in a town called Esher, it's been maintained by Britain's National Trust since Gwynne's death in 2003. Click through for the minimalistic, throwback interior.

Tim Beddow/Interior Archive

The expansive, light-filled, south-facing living room is filled with furniture by Gwynne and designs from Saarinen and Eames.

Tim Beddow/Interior Archive

Gwynne's personal touches infuse the house. In the living room, a painting by Stefan Knapp hangs above a beige leatherette sofa designed by Gwynne.

Tim Beddow/Interior Archive

Nice view, eh? A Saarinen chair in the living room sits behind a Gwynne-designed desk overlooking the garden.

Tim Beddow/Interior Archive

There's definitely room to spare in this minimal abode. Here, built-in wall units covered with Indian laurel run the length of the living room and a vinyl-covered desk on aluminium legs, which was designed by Gwynne, make for an executive feel.

Tim Beddow/Interior Archive

In the dining room, Gwynne's glass-topped round dining table is surrounded by Saarinen chairs.

Tim Beddow/Interior Archive

A sleek, wallpapered office on the ground floor.

Tim Beddow/Interior Archive

The bedroom features a built-in dressing table and wash basin next to a wardrobe that can be concealed behind sliding wooden doors.

Tim Beddow/Interior Archive

A blue and white crystal chandelier hangs above the terrazzo spiral staircase, and a crayon mural by Peter Thompson gives the room an abstract vibe.

Tim Beddow/Interior Archive

This is quite the entry. A concrete spiral staircase descends to the terrazzo-tiled floor of the entrance hall.

Tim Beddow/Interior Archive

For a touch of old British aesthetic, family portraits by Mather Brown hang in a row on a wall behind an armchair designed by Gwynne.

Tim Beddow/Interior Archive

The original kitchen is wide open with a circular trolley and a tiled freestanding unit, which has pull-out chopping boards.

Tim Beddow/Interior Archive

Since you may not always need a bar, this concealed folding bar pulls out from the wood paneling and is surrounded by shelving hidden behind sliding wood doors.

A Patrick Gwynne-designed white leather sofa is mounted on a wall of his former office.

Tim Beddow/Interior Archive

Lookin' good. Behind the curved wall of the second-floor landing sits a curved dressing table for two designed by Gwynne.

Tim Beddow/Interior Archive

Welcome. A covered entryway leads to the Homewood House.