Home Envy

OMG, I Want This House: San Francisco (Photos)

Bring the beach home—without the sand? We’ll take it. Take a look at Ken Fulk’s San Francisco townhouse.

Karyn R Millet/The Interior Archive,Ken Fulk

Karyn R Millet/The Interior Archive

This San Francisco townhouse is another example of interior designer Ken Fulk’s creativity: the houses he works on are personalized and themed especially for each individual project. He and architect Willis Polk have teamed up to create an environment that reflects the ocean that can be seen from the end of the street this townhouse sits on. The living room features white and tan coloring, like the sand on the beach. A 1940s Lucite table sits in the center of the room, with contemporary pieces surrounding it.

Karyn R Millet/The Interior Archive

The influence of the ocean can be seen in the soft blue fabric on an upholstered chair in a corner of the living room, below a piece of lighted contemporary art. This conveys a feeling of an evening walk along the beach, under the moon.

Karyn R Millet/The Interior Archive

The dining room features natural light from a bay window, which looks out into the garden. The woven dining chairs are like a classier version of the seating in most beach-side cabanas.

Karyn R Millet/The Interior Archive

An ebonized ash dining-room table drives the beach theme home, with shells scattered across it. Make sure to eat the dinner, not the sea urchin shells!

Karyn R Millet/The Interior Archive

For dining-room artwork, look toward the wall for a large 20th-century French painting that rests on the ground instead of the traditional wall mounting.

Karyn R Millet/The Interior Archive

In contrast to the darker colors in the dining room, the breakfast room is furnished with lighter hues and more delicate furniture. A painted French trestle table and antique park benches sit within a room that receives its natural light from French windows, which are painted white as well.

Karyn R Millet/The Interior Archive

The woven furniture and brown hues of the beach theme carry over into the small sitting room, where the family can relax and watch television. The room was designed with comfort as a priority, which is evident in the giant pillows.

Karyn R Millet/The Interior Archive

This painted column in the entrance hall has excruciating detail, and could serve as a nice diversion or distraction for house guests.

Karyn R Millet/The Interior Archive

A blue carpet on the grand staircase calls out to the ocean. The wood paneling and carved banister pave the way to the second floor.

Karyn R Millet/The Interior Archive

Sleeping in the master bedroom is like a night on the beach, without the annoyance of sand everywhere in the morning. A chocolate-brown bed with sheets of soft sand and white colors recreates the beach floor. The architecture beneath the eaves is domed like the canopy of the sky.

Karyn R Millet/The Interior Archive

The boy’s bedroom mimics a young boy’s personality, with a fun and energetic orange-and-blue color scheme, and white to unify it.

Karyn R Millet/The Interior Archive

The big dahlia on the wall in the guest bedroom helps keep guests in the nature mood, while the green hues reflect the colors of the ocean.

Karyn R Millet/The Interior Archive

Two girls share this room, with the classic pink color scheme and monogrammed pillows to mark each girl’s bed.

Ken Fulk

How many children’s clubhouses didn’t have a sign like the one on these girls’ door? Signs like this are almost standard on treehouses and castles on the beach alike.

Karyn R Millet/The Interior Archive

The tan colors on the walls in the master bathroom perpetuate the beach theme. But the vintage rolltop bathtub and Victorian chair make this beachside bathroom much classier than anything you might find along the shore.

Karyn R Millet/The Interior Archive

Try to avoid being blinded by the overwhelming whiteness of the guest bathroom, which screams simplicity, while probably inspiring fear in the hearts of guests who need to avoid staining the perfect ivory of the room.

Karyn R Millet/The Interior Archive

The ground in the garden eating area is sandy. A zinc-topped table and four wrought-iron chairs help residents and guests eat on a beach while not consuming a single grain of sand, as usually happens with beachside snacks.

Karyn R Millet/The Interior Archive

A wooden deck in the garden is topped with a wrought-iron table and chairs, providing a sandless outdoor space for reading or snacking.

Ken Fulk

The beachside paradise theme is driven home with a palm tree outside the bay window, in a terra-cotta pot, beside two cypress trees.