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In this new age of corporate philanthropy, businesses can have a major impact on important social issues such as hunger, poverty, and gender inequality. This past week, the Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS), a fully interdisciplinary knowledge-sharing center consisting of scholars, leaders, and practitioners, hosted the “Transforming Lives–Just Business as Usual” panel, a discussion with three leading executives on how businesses can facilitate dramatic social change.

"Can you imagine a world where everyone is literate? Can you imagine a world where we've alleviated poverty?" began event host Kim Meredith, Executive Director of the Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, as the event commenced. "This is the goal of our conversation today, how corporate innovation is actually impacting social innovation."

By Rebecca Webber

The idea that work can empower women is not new. In fact, International Women’s Day, March 8, began over 100 years ago as a celebration of working women. It put the world on notice that one of the best paths to women’s equality is through job training, education and economic independence.

By Rebecca Webber

Imagine if you were told that you couldn’t go to school after the sixth grade. That your opinion didn’t count. Or that no matter how hard you worked, your earnings would always be much less than a man’s.

By Rebecca Webber