• Russia's Pussy Riot preform in their first music video since three members went to prison last year for a prank denouncing Vladimir Putin, July 16, 2013. Three members were sentenced to two years for an anti-Putin "punk prayer" in Moscow's main cathedral. One was later released on probation. (Pussy Riot/AP)

    Antiheroes

    Pussy Riot, Punk and War

    There’s nothing more punk rock than joining the U.S. Army, writes Colby Buzzell.

    Early last year members of the female Russian punk group Pussy Riot stormed into Moscow’s Cathedral of Christ the Savior to protest the church’s support of President Vladimir Putin, donning masks, picking up instruments, and dancing and singing from the pulpit, all of it recorded on a low-budget video they shot and put on YouTube, “Punk Prayer: Mother of God, Chase Putin Away!” Three members of the group were arrested, charged with “hooliganism,” and imprisoned; two of them have 5-year-old children. The world was inflamed by this rough treatment.

    But a year after the verdicts came down, a day of solidarity in New York, Washington, Oslo, Paris, and Manchester passed with hardly a whimper, judging from the sparse turnout and lack of press coverage. What happened?

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