Women

07.19.13

‘He Said,’ but She Didn’t

A study shows The New York Times sources men more than women.

A study by the University of Nevada has shown that front-page stories in The New York Times use male sources 3.4 times more often than female. Phil Corbett, the associate managing editor for standards at the newspaper, said he’s “not surprised that there is a significant discrepancy between male and female sources. But I am disappointed to see just how big the gap is, and how pervasive it is across various types of stories.” Part of the problem may be that female sources are a lot harder to find, because they may be reluctant to speak out as experts in their fields. Corbett also attributed the gender discrepancy to the fact that there are more men in high-level positions than women: only 4 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs are women.