• Ron Tom/ABC

    OMG

    Best ‘Scandal’ Episode Yet

    The ‘Scandal’ finale was a non-stop onslaught of twists and turns and utter insanity. It was also the show's most exciting, craziest episode to date. [WARNING: SPOILERS]

    “My mother blew up the church that almost cost you the presidency.”

    Guys, this show. This exhausting, out-of-its-mind, gloriously brave show, which dares to serve up lines like that with a straight face, like it’s not off its damn rocker. Lines that should cause us to do a spit-take they are so blessedly insane, but instead actually almost move us to tears. It takes nerve to put dialogue like that on air, or plots like the ones that assaulted us all during Scandal's season three finale Thursday night—an episode featuring a bombing, two murders, dozens of betrayals, and enough sordid family drama to make the Lannisters over in Westeros whisper to each other, “Those guys have issues…”

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  • Ovation TV

    In Her Words

    Susan Boyle: Overcoming Asperger’s

    The bestselling singer and ‘Britain’s Got Talent’ alum writes about her battle with the disorder.

    Simple Susan, mad, odd, bizarre. Names I have been called over the last 53 years of my life. 

    Born in a small Scottish village at a time where medicine and diagnosis was in its infancy and hadn’t made the great advancements that we see today, my parents were told not to expect much from me as they were led to believe I had been brain damaged at birth. 

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  • Adrian Sanchez-Gonzalez/AFP/Getty

    Dirty Divas

    The Pornification of Pop

    When actress Rashida Jones admonished female pop stars for ‘acting like whores,’ she set off a firestorm of criticism—and started a conversation about the pornification of everything.

    Rashida Jones bristles at the suggestion that she’s a prude.

    “I love sex,” the 37-year-old actress and writer declared recently in Glamour magazine. “Hell, I’ve even posed in my underwear.” But Jones also bristles at an instinct so common among young female pop stars to showcase their private parts, à la Miley Cyrus gyrating on stage in latex scanties. Last October, Jones created a mini-furor when she tweeted, “This week’s celeb news takeaway: she who comes closest to showing the actual inside of her vagina is most popular #stopactinglikewhores.”

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  • Boston Globe/Getty

    We Are Family

    The Silverman Sister Act

    On the surface, it may raise an eyebrow that controversial comedian Sarah Silverman’s sister is a renowned rabbi. That is, until you get to know them.

    At this point, there are few things that Sarah Silverman could say or do that would shock people. But mention that the consistently controversial—and consistently hilarious—comedian’s sister is one of the world’s most renowned and influential rabbis, and watch those who thought they’d seen or heard everything from the professional button-pusher react, once again, with surprise.

    But learn more about Sarah’s sister, Rabbi Susan Silverman, and it becomes abundantly clear that even though “I’m godless and she’s godfull,” as Sarah puts it, audacity runs in the family.

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  • Mario Magnani/Getty

    UNGOOP

    What’s ‘Conscious Uncoupling’?

    Gwyneth Paltrow and Chris Martin have announced their intention to ‘consciously uncouple’—whatever that means. But could something quite sensible lie behind this hokey-sounding separation cleanse?

    For Gwyneth Paltrow and Chris Martin, there will be no clothes thrown out of windows, car tires slashed, and screaming confrontations on the street. No, unsurprisingly for this queen of all things holistic—who once heard rocks talking to her—even the breakdown of her marriage must come, as they say, from a good place. As revealed in a break-up statement on her website Goop, she and Martin have decided to “consciously uncouple.”

    Consider yourself in good company if you think this sounds like one of those hippy-dippy expressions new-agers say in the heat of the Los Angeles sun, and in response everyone around them just nods politely while thinking, “Yeah, good luck with whatever that is.”

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  • Rachel Harris of the new television show "Surviving Jack" participates in Fox Broadcasting Company's part of the Television Critics Association (TCA) Winter 2014 presentations in Pasadena, California, January 13, 2014. (Kevork Djansezian/Reuters)

    I Love the ‘90s

    ‘The Bitch’ Survives Typecasting

    After years of being typecast as ‘the bitch’ thanks to ‘The Hangover,’ Rachael Harris finally gets the warm sitcom role she deserves in Fox’s Surviving Jack.

    Rachael Harris is not a bitch.

    That's important to clarify right off the bat, because you just might have the wrong impression of the Surviving Jack star. Before landing the role as the warm, but mischievous, mother in the '90s-set ABC sitcom, Harris has made a career out of playing the kind of sharp-tongued, caustic characters that you relish watching on TV and in movies but wouldn't be able to handle spending two minutes in the same room with in real life. You know, for the sake of your self-esteem.

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  • Jemima Kirke. (Jessica Miglio/HBO)

    Artist First

    More Than Just a ‘Girl’

    Playing Jessa is both a blessing and a curse for Jemima Kirke. It helped the artist/actress win her latest exhibit in San Francisco, but she’d rather be seen as, first of all, an artist.

    Before the world came to know her as the actress who plays the wistful bohemian Jessa Johansson on the hit HBO series Girls, the 28-year-old London-born, Brooklyn-based Jemima Kirke was an artist. Kirke even earned a BFA in painting from one of the most prestigious art schools in the country, the Rhode Island School of Design, the alma mater of artists who include Jenny Holzer, Kara Walker, and the late Francesca Woodman. Her art career may have taken an unexpected detour due to her role on Girls, but a new exhibition proves that Kirke, who maintains that she’s an artist before an actress, is still on her way to making it. 

    Last Friday, San Francisco’s Fouladi Projects opened an exhibition of Kirke’s paintings entitled, “Platforms,” which runs through May 10. Kirke’s second solo show features oil portraits of women in her life. The exhibition almost didn’t happen; Kirke was initially hesitant when the women who run the gallery, Holly Fouladi and Hope Bryson, approached her about staging a show of her work after discovering her email address on her artist website.

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  • The Daily Beast

    WINTOUR’S FAIL?

    Will Kim and Kanye Kill Vogue?

    Is putting ‘Kimye’ on the cover of Vogue a bravura business decision or one which editor-in-chief Anna Wintour will come to regret?

    Usually it takes a major scandal to shake consumer confidence in a brand. But in the case of Vogue magazine it appears that all it took was putting Kim Kardashian on its cover. The reality show starlet graces the April issue in a wedding gown alongside her fiancé Kanye West.

    The backlash has been swift and brutal. Actress Sarah Michelle Gellar led the charge with a tweet that read “Well……I guess I’m canceling my Vogue subscription. Who is with me???”

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  • Paul Drinkwater/NBC, via Getty

    Ultimate Feminist

    Miss Piggy Leans In

    Miss Piggy is confident, driven, and fights for what she wants. She embraces her "extra fabulous" looks and is unapologetically outspoken. And she doesn’t care what you think about it.

    Over the years, Miss Piggy has been faulted for her clingy, seemingly obsessive relationship with Kermit the Frog. His unwillingness to marry her and settle down has only increased her fervor. Miss Piggy is so desperate, many think. So how does this longingness for acceptance and attention by a male figure a true feminist make?

    Since her emergence on the television screen in the mid-seventies, Miss Piggy has been one of Hollywood’s reigning divas, overcoming and surpassing her years as a nameless swine in a male-dominated group. Her roots were humble and tinged with tragedy. “She grew up in a small town in Iowa; her father died when she was young, and her mother wasn't that nice to her,” Frank Oz told The New York Times in 1979. “She had to enter beauty contests to survive, as many single women do. She has a lot of vulnerability which she has to hide, because of her need to be a superstar." But Miss Piggy persevered, transforming her culpabilities into a successful career and becoming an icon to countless generations.  

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  • Brendan O'Sullivan/Photoshot, via Getty

    The Week in Death

    You Didn’t Mess With This Fat Lady

    The chequered life of Clarissa Dickson Wright, the larger of the two stars on the eccentric cooking show ‘Two Fat Ladies.’

    Clarissa Dickson Wright, who has died aged 66, sprang to celebrity as the larger of the Two Fat Ladies in the astonishingly popular television series.

    Clarissa Dickson Wright was a recovering alcoholic, running a bookshop for cooks in Edinburgh when the producer Patricia Llewellyn was inspired to pair her with the equally eccentric Jennifer Paterson, then a cook and columnist at The Spectator. The emphasis of the program was to be on “suets and tipsy cake rather than rocket salad and sun-dried tomatoes,” the producer declared. Hence bombastic tributes to such delights as cream cakes and animal fats were mingled with contemptuous references to “manky little vegetarians.”

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  • Backlash

    The Kimye 'Vogue' Backlash

    It’s finally happened. Kim Kardashian has gained Anna Wintour’s approval and, along with her beau, graced the cover of 'Vogue.' But the Internet, led by Sarah Michelle Gellar, has spoken.

    “There’s no way Kim Kardashian shouldn’t be on the cover of Vogue, she’s like the most intriguing woman right now. She’s got Barbara Walters calling her like everyday.”

    None other than Kanye West, the loudest—and most innovative—voice in hip-hop, made this proclamation to Ryan Seacrest in an interview late last year.

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  • Jaap Buitendijk/Summit Entertainment

    Pantsuits

    Hollywood vs. Hillary 2016

    The villain in the new movie Divergent bears a striking resemblance to Hillary Clinton. Why are Hollywood’s powerful female leaders always the bad guys?

    Many people will love Divergent, the new Hunger Games-style science-fiction movie that arrives Friday in theaters: fans of the blockbuster young-adult novel by Veronica Roth on which the film is based; fans of actress Shailene Woodley, who plays Roth’s nonconformist heroine Tris; fans of a post-apocalyptic future in which the Earth’s remaining human beings wall themselves off inside the ruins of a major metropolis (in this case, Chicago) and split up into five factions (Abnegation, Amity, Candor, Dauntless, and Erudite) designed to “keep the peace.”

    One person who won’t love Divergent, however, is Hillary Clinton.

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  • Rosario Dawson arrives for the world premiere of "Trance" at Leicester Square in London March 19, 2013. (Luke MacGregor/Reuters)

    Outspoken

    Rosario on Beating Hollywood Bias

    The actress-activist discusses her latest film ‘Cesar Chavez’ and how she navigated the treacherous, sexist, and oft-racist terrain of Hollywood.

    Rosario Dawson is, in many ways, an anomaly. One day, filmmaker Larry Clark and screenwriter Harmony Korine spotted her on her front stoop in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, and asked her to audition for a role in their movie. It was the cultural touchstone Kids, and at 15, Dawson, a young woman of Puerto Rican and Afro-Cuban descent raised in an abandoned building squat, was granted entrée into Hollywood.

    Over the years, she’s managed to become one of the most formidable Latina actors in the biz, someone who, in an industry that loves to pigeonhole actors of color, has convincingly played everything from a government agent (Eagle Eye) to a femme fatale (Trance).

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