10.06.11

Jobs Authorized Bio For Kids

Steve Jobs, one of the most visionary Americans of his generation and the cofounder of Apple computers, died Wednesday. He was 56. Read about his life.

Jobs Authorized Bio For Kids
Oct. 6, 2011 11:20 PM EDT

The famously-private Steve Jobs authorized a biography so his children could get to know him better, his biographer said Thursday. “I wasn’t always there for them, and I wanted them to know why and to understand what I did,” Jobs is quoted as telling Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Walter Isaacson during their final interview. Jobs has four children from two different relationships. Isaacson said he visited Jobs for the last time a few weeks ago, and found Jobs in pain, but Isaacson said the Apple visionary’s “mind was still sharp and his humor vibrant.” Jobs died Wednesday at the age of 56 after a long battle with pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer.

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Spotlight Falls on Apple's Design Chief

Steve Jobs was famously involved in the intimate details of Apple’s products, particularly their look and feel, which he would describe ecstatically in his iconic keynote presentations. But now that he’s gone, will Apple be able to put the same passion for design into its gadgets? The spotlight will fall on Jonathan Ive, a the British designer who took over Apple’s design department in 1996. He has already played a major role in the aesthetics of Apple—designing the market-dominating iPad, for example—but his responsibilities are likely to increase in Job’s absence. Ive’s role is so important that he will report directly to Tim Cook, who took the reins of the company from Jobs in August.

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Kevork Djansezian / Getty Images

 

Mock Turtleneck Sales Soar

Steve Jobs has been given many titles: genius, innovator, leader. And now, fashion icon. The late Apple CEO’s signature black turtleneck has surged in popularity since his death Wednesday night. St. Croix—Jobs’s go-to brand for $175 mock turtles—has experienced an “almost 100 percent increase in sales” in the past 24 hours. The company is proud of Jobs’s loyal patronage and even plans to hold some type of memorial for him.

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Jobs’s Legacy Preserved at ‘Apple University’

Apple and Steve Jobs have been planning a secret project for years, but now that the company’s co-founder and former CEO has died, Apple will likely be expediting its development. Wanting the company’s legacy to live on in a different way than it has through its life-changing technology, Jobs developed the vision for an executive training program called Apple University, which would essentially teach Apple execs to think like him. “The idea was to take what is unique about Apple and create a forum that can impart that DNA to future generations of Apple employees,” a former Apple exec told the Los Angeles Times. Apple has not yet commented on the project, but people familiar with it said Jobs recruited the dean of Yale’s Business School in 2008 to run the University. Read it here.

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Bill Gates: ‘I Will Miss Steve Immensely’

Jobs’s longtime competitor, Microsoft founder Bill Gates, issued a statement Wednesday night, saying he is “truly saddened” about Jobs’s death. “Steve and I first met nearly 30 years ago, and have been colleagues, competitors and friends over the course of more than half our lives,” Gates said in a statement. “The world rarely sees someone who has had the profound impact Steve has had, the effects of which will be felt for many generations to come.” Gates said it had been “an insanely great honor” to know Jobs. Read his statement here.

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7 Best Reads on Steve Jobs’s Life

From a tech blogger’s regrets over spurning the Apple founder’s kindness to Jobs’s 1985 Playboy interview, The Daily Beast picks the best journalism from the archives.

Read it here.

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Apple's Tough Road Ahead Without Jobs

Apple stock was steady on Thursday following the announcement of Steve Jobs’s death, dipping only .1 percent, proving that investors weren’t immediately discouraged about the company’s future. Steve Jobs’s passing comes at a crucial moment for Apple and its new CEO, Tim Cook: it is surrounded by ferocious competitors bent on ending its dominance. Google hopes to beat the iPhone with its Android operating system; Netflix wants to become the premier destination for Internet streaming; and Amazon is undercutting the iPad with its inexpensive new tablet, the Kindle Fire. Jobs was able to make investors and consumers believe with his near-religious descriptions of the company’s products, but Cook is a more technical leader. His challenge will be to fight the real or imagined impression that Apple’s products are slipping without Jobs behind them.

Read it here.

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Apple Fans Swarm Stores and Headquarters

An outpouring of grief was on display at Apple headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., where a flag flew at half staff to honor Steve Jobs. Meanwhile, Apple retail stores from San Francisco to New York to Hong Kong were mobbed with well-wishers. In San Francisco, visitors taped greeting cards to windows and laid down flowers. A store employee held an iPad with a quote from the late Jobs on it. "What he's done for us as a culture, it resonates uniquely in every person. Even if they never use an Apple product, the impact they have had is so far-reaching," Cory Moll told Reuters.

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Jobs Died 'Surrounded by Family'
Oct. 5, 2011 7:46 p.m. ET

Steve Jobs, considered one of the most visionary Americans of his generation and the cofounder of Apple, died Wednesday. Apple's board said in a statement that Jobs died "peacefully surrounded by his family," but did not give a cause of death, although he suffered from pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer for years. He was 56. Jobs cofounded Apple in 1976 with his childhood friend Steve Wozniak. In 1984 Apple launched the famous Macintosh computer, and Jobs went on to buy Pixar from George Lucas during an 11-year absence from Apple. During Jobs’s second tenure at Apple, he introduced OSX, the iPod, the iPhone, and the iPad—all considered revolutionary innovations. In 2004, Jobs announced he had a rare form of cancer, and in 2009 he was forced to take a six-month leave of absence. He returned, but health issues led him to take another leave at the beginning of 2011 before he eventually resigned as CEO in August. Apple released a statement Wednesday night saying they had "lost a visionary and creative genius" and "his spirit will forever be the foundation of Apple."

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Regrets From the Man Who Fired Steve Jobs
by Tom Weber

In the annals of blown calls, it ranks somewhere between the publishers who turned down the first Harry Potter book and baseball umpire Jim Joyce’s instantly infamous perfect-game flub last year. It was the spring of 1985, and the board of Apple Computer decided it no longer needed the services of one Steven P. Jobs.

The key antagonist in the tech world’s biggest soap opera of a quarter-century ago: John Sculley, the Pepsi executive whom Apple’s board brought in as CEO to oversee Jobs and grow the company. Sculley found that he couldn’t rein in Jobs—and decided he had to go.

Read it here.

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From the Archives: Steve Jobs on the Birth of the Mac

In fall 1984, Tom Zito interviewed a 29-year-old Steve Jobs months after he introduced his first Mac for Access a special issue of Newsweek. Under the headline “The Bang Behind the Bucks, The Life Behind the Style,” Jobs spoke candidly about the birth of Silicon Valley, the IBM-ization of America—and what defines a “nerd.”

Read it here.

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Zuckerberg, Gates, and More Pay Tribute

The Apple cofounder ushered in a new era with his game-changing inventions. Read tributes to his work from Apple cofounder Steve Wozniak, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, President Obama, and more.

Read it here.

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Getty Images

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Jobs’s Unorthodox Treatment
by Sharon Begley

Some of Apple trailblazer Steve Jobs’s cancer treatment choices, from alternative therapies to a liver transplant, may not have extended his life—and may have even shortened it, reports Sharon Begley.

Steve Jobs was right to be optimistic when, in 2004, he announced that he had cancer in his pancreas. Although cancer of the pancreas has a terrible prognosis—half of all patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer die within 10 months of the diagnosis; half of those in whom it has metastasized die within six months—cancer in the pancreas is not necessarily a death sentence.

Read it here.

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Secrets of His Success
by
Alan Deutschman

How did Steve Jobs become a wizard among muggles? If ever there was a showman who knew how to end on a high note—leaving his awed and adoring audience begging for more—it was the man in the trademark black mock turtleneck, Alan Deutschman wrote in Newsweek following Jobs's resignation in August.

Read it here.

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Steve Jobs’s Biological Dad Regretted Adoption

Steve Jobs’s biological father, Abdulfattah John Jandali, told The Daily Mail in August that he’s never met his son. "I'd be lying if I said it doesn't sadden me to have not been part of my son's incredible journey," Jandali said. Now the vice president of a casino in Reno, Jandali said his ex-wife moved away and put their son up for adoption after her father did not approve of her marrying a Syrian. (Later she would come back and marry Jandali.) Jandali says he emailed Jobs but never called. "This might sound strange, though, but I am not prepared, even if either of us was on our deathbeds, to pick up the phone to call him,” he said. “The Syrian pride in me does not want him ever to think I am after his fortune.”

Read it here.

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Steve's Employees Say Goodbye
by Brian Ries

"His legacy wasn't any specific product. It's Apple. That's a lot of pressure. We have to rise to it and make all his work worth it." That's what software engineer Blake Seely posted on Twitter after Steve's death. Read more of Apple's own employees mourning the loss of their former CEO.

Read it here.

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President Obama: ‘The World Has Lost a Visionary’

President Obama issued a statement Wednesday night about Jobs’s death, saying “there may be no greater tribute to Steve’s success than the fact that much of the world learned of his passing on a device he invented.” Obama also paid tribute to Jobs by saying “by building one of the planet’s most successful companies from his garage, he exemplified the spirit of American ingenuity. By making computers personal and putting the Internet in our pockets, he made the information revolution not only accessible, but intuitive and fun. And by turning his talents to storytelling, he has brought joy to millions of children and grownups alike. Steve was fond of saying that he lived every day like it was his last. Because he did, he transformed our lives, redefined entire industries, and achieved one of the rarest feats in human history: he changed the way each of us sees the world.” Read his statement here.

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Tim Cook: ‘Steve Leaves Behind a Company Only He Could Have Built’

Steve Jobs’s hand-picked successor, Tim Cook, issued a statement to Apple employees Wednesday saying “the world has lost an amazing human being.” “Steve leaves behind a company only he could have built, and his spirit will forever be the foundation of Apple,” Cook said in an email. Cook said they are planning a “celebration” of Jobs’s life for Apple employees, and he urged everyone to send memories to rememberingsteve@apple.com. “No words can adequately express our sadness at Steve’s death or our gratitude for the opportunity to work with him,” Cook wrote. Read his statement here.

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The 10 Commandments of Steve

More than anything else, Jobs's genius was in managing the creative process. In Newsweek, Leander Kahney presents the American visionary’s playbook. No. 1: Go for perfect. Read the rest here.

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How Apple Revolutionized Our World
by Paul Theroux

Steve Jobs’s dazzling inventions have forever changed us.

Steve Jobs, An American hero, is wholly authentic because—in addition to being a brilliant, cranky inventor in the mold of Gyro Gearloose or Thomas Edison—he has a hero’s history of failures and false starts that he turned into successes. He is an American hero in another sense, too: a supercool billionaire, the dropout son of the early ’70s counterculture whose seminal text is The Whole Earth Catalog. He is resigning from Apple at the height of his achievement, the pinnacle of his fame, the most gorgeous gracility of his charisma, his fortune growing miraculously in spite of his salary of $1 a year—all without the benefit of a necktie.

Read it at Newsweek

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Jobs’s Resignation Letter

Steve Jobs announces he's stepping down as Apple's CEO.

Press Release: Letter From Steve Jobs

August 24, 2011–To the Apple Board of Directors and the Apple Community:

I have always said if there ever came a day when I could no longer meet my duties and expectations as Apple’s CEO, I would be the first to let you know. Unfortunately, that day has come.

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Steve Jobs’s Memorable Moments
by The Daily Beast Video

Steve Jobs, the visionary CEO behind Apple, died Wednesday of pancreatic cancer at age 56. From introducing the first Macintosh to a rare conversation with Bill Gates, WATCH VIDEO of his most memorable appearances.

The swagger, vision, and CEO presence—Steve Jobs seemed to have it all from his first appearance on the world stage. In 1984, the Apple chief introduced the first personal Macintosh computer before a breathless audience. That Mac would go on to revolutionize technology and Jobs’ presentation, naturally, had all the flair that would go on to define the world’s most valuable company.

Watch it here.

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Paul Sakuma / AP Photo

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The Secrets of Succession
by Dan Lyons

No one can replace Steve Jobs at Apple—and maybe that’s all part of the design.

Here’s a story that gives you a little idea of what it would be like to work for Steve Jobs. I call it the story of the rude engineer. It was told to me by a friend of the Apple engineer involved.

Filling in for his boss, who was out of town, the engineer attended a meeting with another group inside Apple. Those guys showed the engineer what they were working on, and instead of responding politely, the engineer lashed into them, shredding their ideas and telling the vice president in charge of the project that his team’s work was utter crap.

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