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02.12.12

Rick Santorum, Sarah Palin, Ron Paul and More Sunday Talk

Rick Santorum won’t compromise on contraception, Sarah Palin isn’t wowed by Romney’s conservatism, Mitch McConnell reaches across the aisle, and more in our Sunday talk roundup.

Santorum: Not Satisfied with Contraception Solution

And the contraception saga continues. On Friday, President Obama revised his health care plan so religiously affiliated institutions wouldn’t have to pay for contraception. While the compromise appeased some, Rick Santorum told Meet the Press that the government should stay out of the issue all together. “There is no compromise here,” Santorum said. “They are forcing religious organizations either directly or indirectly to pay for something that they find is a deeply morally wrong thing.” Santorum added that, as a Catholic, he is opposed to contraception, though he “has no problem” with women having access to it.

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Palin: Not Convinced by Romney

Sarah Palin is a creationist, but she does believe in evolution—the evolution of Mitt Romney, that is. On Fox News Sunday Palin said that Romney’s idea of conservatism is “evolving,” citing several instances in which the former Massachusetts governor leaned to the left. She even coined a new term, “Obamney Care,” in reference to the parallels between Romney and Obama’s health-care mandates. “We will want to see that candidate whom we can trust will just inherently and instinctively turn right,“ Palin said. “I am not convinced, and I don’t think that the majority of GOP and independent voters are convinced, and that is why you don’t see Romney get over that hump.”

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Paul: Ready for More of the Same?

One of the GOP candidates is not like the others, and according to Ron Paul, it’s him. On Face the Nation, the Texas congressman didn’t waste words when referring to Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum, and Newt Gingrich. “All of them are rather typical of what is wrong with the country.” Paul added, “I think the problem is, is that all three of them have represented the same system, the same status quo in not wanting changes in the foreign policy…They’re not a whole lot different.”

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Lew Goes to Bat for Obama

White House Chief of Staff Jack Lew made the rounds today, appearing on five Sunday political shows to preview the Obama administration’s budget proposal. Yet the past week’s controversial contraception mandate dominated most of the conversation. On State of the Union, Lew defended the president, saying that his revision to the ruling “respects the core principles of both sides.” He added, “The solution that we came up with, puts no religious institution in the position where it either has to pay for or facilitate the provision of benefits they find objectionable.”

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Ryan: The Truth About Medicare

Is Paul Ryan trying to do away with Medicare? Despite a recent ad put out by the Democrats, Ryan says his intention is just the opposite. On This Week, the chairman of the House budget committee said that his new proposal is actually intended to “strengthen and save” the program, and that Obama’s plan is the true drain on Medicare funds. “The president’s health-care law takes half a trillion dollars from Medicare to spend on Obamacare,” Paul said. “So when the dust settles and people see actually what we're doing, how we’re promoting bipartisan solutions, I think we’re going to be fine."

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Mitch McConnell to Offer Obama’s Budget

How’s that for working across the aisle? Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell told Face the Nation that due to an underperforming Senate, he intends to offer the president’s budget up for a vote. “Probably the only budget votes we’ll have in a Senate which refuses to follow the law and pass a budget of its own would be a House-passed budget and the president’s budget,” McConnell said. “So I intend to offer the president’s budget for him so he’ll have a chance to get a vote on it.” The Kentucky senator did the same thing last year, and the budget was turned down in a 97-0 vote.

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Is the Media Falling Behind?

On Reliable Sources the panel discussed why the media took so long to cover the contraception mandate controversy. According to Frank Sesno, a professor of media at George Washington University, this sort of “lag time” is typical in stories rooted in policy. Nevertheless, once the story gets a little momentum, all bets are off. “When you go into hyperdrive and you’ve got the candidates and others, that’s when you get the media pile on, that’s when you get the multiplier effect,” Sesno said.

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