Out of Tune

08.01.13

Is 'Asian Girlz' Summer's Most Offensive Song? (POLL)

How does “Asian Girlz” rank against “Blurred Lines” and “Accidental Racist”? Vote in our poll.

Ah, the joys of summer: lounging at a barbecue, sipping a cold beer out of a red Solo cup, and mindlessly singing along to songs about anal sex with Asians girls. Welcome to the summer of offensive songs.

“Asian Girlz,” a new song by the L.A.-based group Day Above Ground, is the offensive cherry on top of the distasteful sundae, capping off a summer that began with a country-rap song (!?) about having pride in the Confederacy, was dominated by a track about forcing women to have wild sex with you, and is now ending with a track that includes the lyrics, “I love your sticky rice / buttfucking all night.”

So how does “Asian Girlz” rank against the summer’s other offensive songs. Have a listen at six offenders, and then vote in our poll.

“Asian Girlz” by Day Above Ground

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Gawker has already dubbed “Asian Girlz” the “most racist song ever.” Why? Well, on top of those charming “sticky rice / buttfucking all night” lyrics mentioned earlier, here are some other choice lines: “I love your creamy yellow thighs / Ooh your slanted eyes” and “it’s the Year of the Dragon / ninja pussy I’m stabbin’.” The band has since offered one of those “we apologize that you were offended” apologies, serving up that asinine “we’re a multicultural band so we couldn’t possibly be racist” arguments.

“Accidental Racist” by Brad Paisley and LL Cool J

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Just before summer began, Brad Paisley and LL Cool J arrived to cure racism. They didn’t succeed. The misguided duo recorded “Accidental Racist,” invoking the KKK, slavery, and the Confederate flag in an attempt to remedy centuries of cultural stereotypes and injustices. Spoiler alert: it didn’t work.

“Blurred Lines” by Robin Thicke f. T.I. and Pharrell

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Unequivocally, “Blurred Lines” has been the song of the summer. It’s also launched the debate of the summer. Is the song—with the lyrics “I hate these blurred lines / I know you want it / but you’re a good girl / the way you grab me / must want to get nasty”—arguing that a woman who dresses sexy and acts flirty is asking for a man to have wild sex with her (you know, without actually asking him to)? In other words, is it “kind of rapey”? Or is it, as Thicke argues, a “feminist movement in itself”?

“Don’t Ya” by Brett Eldredge

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For all the controversy stirred by “Blurred Lines,” the website Popdust claims that it’s Brett Eldredge’s “Don’t Ya” that’s actually more misogynistic, taking the “problematic content of Thicke’s summer anthem” and blowing them up “to disturbing proportions.” The song suggests that a girl who flirts at a bar is begging for a guy to aggressively pursue her and take her home at the end of the night: “Don’t lie you’ve got it all figured out / that smile has got me spinnin’ around / don’t even try actin’ like it ain’t no thing.” In other words, flirty girls deserve stalkers.

“Jodeci Freestyle” by Drake f. J. Cole

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One line from Drake’s song, rapped in a guest verse by J. Cole, was enough to prompt a petition from the Anti-Bullying Alliance and warrant apologies from both Drake and J. Cole. In “Jodeci Freestyle,” J. Cole raps, “I’m artistic, you niggas is autistic, retarded.” Drake has since removed the lyric from the song.

“Redneck Crazy” by Tyler Farr

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The title of this song alone is enough to ruffle feathers among those who don’t exactly enjoy being called a redneck just because they live their lives a certain way. But beyond that, it co-opts the phrase “going redneck crazy” as a cutesy, fun way to refer to getting dangerously drunk and taking violent revenge on a woman who breaks up with you. The logic, apparently, is that such behavior is OK…because you’re a redneck and that’s what rednecks do? Don't think so, y’all.