1. EQUAL RIGHTS

    Argentine Prostitutes Fight for Union

    TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY SONIA BAKARIC AND KAOUTHER LARBI  
A Tunisian prostitute works in a brothel in the district of "Abdallah Guech" in Tunis on February 19, 2011. On February 18, dozens of Islamists attempted to set fire to the area following an after-prayers rally outside the interior ministry, demanding an end to Tunisia's brothels. The street near the Medina contains one of Tunis's main brothels, well known to foreigners as well as locals. Since these attacks, prostitutes now live in fear for their safety. AFP PHOTO / FETHI BELAID (Photo credit should read FETHI BELAID/AFP/Getty Images)

    Fethi Belaid, AFP / Getty Images

    Elena Reynaga, the head of two of Latin America’s biggest charities that aim to help sex workers, is calling for the creation of a union for sex workers. Reynaga spent 30 years a prostitute until she left to head up Redtrasex (Latin American and Caribbean Sex Workers Network) and Anmar (Female Sex Workers’ Association of Argentina), which operates as an unofficial trade union. But Reynaga wants to take it one step further and make sex workers officially unionized. “We consider ourselves working people,” Reynaga says. “We want to get all the rights that people who work enjoy: the right to a pension, social security …” As World AIDS Day approaches on Thursday, Reynaga said she hopes a union would help combat the spread of the deadly virus amongst sex workers.

    Read it at Metro