1. SUPPORTERS

    Gingrich Praises Cain After Exit

    ATLANTA, GA - DECEMBER 03:  People wait outside holding signs before Republican presidential candidate Herman Cain speaks at the scheduled opening of a local campaign headquarters on December 3, 2011 in Atlanta, Georgia. Cain has taken time to reassess the condition of his campaign "because of all this media firestorm stuff," adding, "my wife and family comes first."  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

    Scott Olson / Getty Images

    Following Cain's concession speech, former rival Newt Gingrich praised his 9-9-9 plan on Twitter for getting "our country talking about the critical issue of tax reform," adding that he was "proud to know Herman Cain and consider him a friend and I know he will continue to be a powerful voice for years to come.” Jon Huntsman, who had called Cain's allegations "a distraction" last week, also commended him in a statement. During his speech, Cain ominously declared that he will soon make a presidential endorsement. Rick Perry's campaign was the first to pitch itself to Cain's supporters in Georgia and elsewhere, who are lost and disheartened by his decision. “I feel like I’ve thrown my money away,” said a man who had pledged $1,000 to Cain's campaign. State Rep. Scott Plakon, who had backed Tim Pawlenty until getting on the Cain train for the Florida straw poll, said, "I may just focus on my legislative duties now." Former Michigan state representative Jack Hoogendyk, who had helped Cain attract Tea Party supporters, seemed equally lost and not "ready to work for anyone else."

    Read it at Politico