Up to 3 Million Fewer Insured

    WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 28:  Protestors stand outside the U.S. Supreme Court on June 28, 2012 in Washington, DC. The Court found the Affordable Healthcare Act  to be constitutional and did not strike down any part of it. (Photo by Kris Connor/Getty Images)

    Kris Connor / Getty Images

    A report by the Congressional Budget Office on Tuesday said the Supreme Court’s ruling on President Obama’s health-care law could mean 3 million fewer people will have insurance than originally predicted. Of the 33 million people who had been expected to gain coverage under the law, the CBO said 3 million fewer would get insurance since the court said the large expansion of Medicare originally envisioned would be a state option, not a federal requirement. While it is not clear how many states will opt out of the expansion, the CBO said 6 million fewer people will be covered under Medicaid, although half of those will probably be eligible for insurance through private companies. Meanwhile, the CBO said the health-care ruling could save the federal government $84 billion over the next 11 years.

    Read it at The New York Times