1. FOR REAL?

    Castaway Called Into Doubt

    A shark fin is pictured aboard the Ocean Sunset commercial fishing boat in the Pacific Ocean off of Ucluelet, British Columbia June 24, 2012. The Ocean Sunset hunts sharks as well as other fish for their meat and fins. After the fishermen catch them, dogfish sharks are sent to a processing plant, the fins are removed and the body is skinned. The bellies are exported to Germany to be smoked for pub food, and the fins are sent to Asia, where they are used in shark fin soup - a delicacy in Chinese culture. Animal rights advocates criticise the shark fin harvest but others say that eating shark fins is an old cultural tradition. Picture taken June 24, 2012 REUTERS/Ben Nelms (CANADA - Tags: ENVIRONMENT ANIMALS FOOD SOCIETY)

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    © Ben Nelms / Reuters

    More details have emerged about Jose Salvador Alvarenga's alleged 13 months adrift in the Pacific. After leaving for a shark-catching trip on Dec. 21, 2012, Alvarenga, a fisherman, said the motor of his boat died, and he spent some days drifting until he realized he was lost in the Pacific Ocean. He said he survived by catching turtles, birds, and fish, but as harrowing as Alvarenga's tale of survival is, some experts are skeptical. "It's hard for me to imagine someone surviving 13 months at sea," said Tom Armbruster, U.S. ambassador to the Marshall Islands. "But it's also hard to imagine how someone might arrive on Ebon out of the blue."

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