1. FIRST DO NO HARM?

    CIA Doctor: Torture Worked

    GUANTANAMO BAY, CUBA - SEPTEMBER 16:  (EDITORS NOTE: Image has been reviewed by the U.S. Military prior to transmission.) A U.S. military guard carries shackles before moving a detainee inside the U.S. detention center for "enemy combatants" on September 16, 2010 in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. With attempts by the Obama administration to close the facility stalled, some 170 detainees remain at the detention center, which was opened by the Bush administration after the attacks of 9/11. The facility is run by Joint Task Force Guantanamo, located on the U.S. Naval Station at Guantanamo Bay on the southeastern coast of Cuba.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)

    John Moore/Getty

    Dr. James Elmer Mitchell, the psychologist behind the CIA’s post-9/11 interrogation program, spoke out for the first time Friday. "I'm just a guy who got asked to do something for his country by people at the highest level of government, and I did the best that I could,” he claimed. Mitchell is singled out in the soon-to-be-released Senate investigation into the CIA’s detention and interrogation program, which reports that torture did not gain useful intelligence. Mitchell says that’s not true. “In the fairyland they live in, all you have to do is give somebody some tea and a cookie, and everything will be OK,” he told The Guardian. He says people have no idea what the methods look like, and that “people who have this Jack Bauer mentality, I think, don't understand how intel networks work … I think this idea that you tape a guy's hands to the steering wheel and break his thumbs and he tells you where the bomb is and you go get it is a fantasy.”

    Read it at The Guardian