1. NOT GOOD

    Report: Russia, China Crack Snowden Docs

    Former U.S. National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden appears live via video during a student organized world affairs conference at the Upper Canada College private high school in Toronto, February 2, 2015.    REUTERS/Mark Blinch (CANADA - Tags: POLITICS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY MEDIA EDUCATION) - RTR4NZE6

    Mark Blinch/Reuters

    Russia and China have allegedly decrypted the top-secret cache of files stolen by whistleblower Edward Snowden, according to a report from The Sunday Times, to be published tomorrow. The info has compelled British intelligence agency MI6 to withdraw some of its agents from active operations and other Western intelligence agencies are now actively involved in rescue operations. In a July 2013 email to a former U.S. Senator, Snowden stated that, "No intel­li­gence ser­vice—not even our own—has the capac­ity to com­pro­mise the secrets I con­tinue to pro­tect. While it has not been reported in the media, one of my spe­cial­iza­tions was to teach our peo­ple at DIA how to keep such infor­ma­tion from being com­pro­mised even in the high­est threat counter-intelligence envi­ron­ments (i.e. China)." Many in the intelligence agencies at the time greeted this claim with scepticism. Now, one senior British official said Snowden had "blood on his hands," but another said there's yet no evidence anyone was harmed. Snowden eventually fled to Russia via Hong Kong after downloading some 1.7 million documents from U.S. government computers and leaking them to journalists out of a desire to protect "privacy and basic liberties." The revelations of mass spying outraged populations and governments around the world, at least temporarily damaged relations, and eventually led to changes in the mass surveillance policies of the NSA and British GCHQ. A report in The Guardian on Sunday has called into question both the timing and accuracy of The Sunday Times report, as it relied completely on anonymous sourcing and comes just days after a report on terrorism legislation.

    Read it at BBC News