World News

Religious Violence Engulfs Central African Republic (PHOTOS)

Fighting between Christian and Muslim militias has the United Nations warning of a humanitarian catastrophe in the Central African Republic.

Siegfried Modola/Reuters

Luc Gnago/Reuters

Red Cross workers carry a body from a mass grave at a military camp occupied by Seleka rebels in the capital of Bangui on February 17, 2014. The U.N. warned of "ethnic-religious cleansing" in the Central African Republic, where violence has gripped the former French colony since March, when the mainly Muslim rebels seized power. (REUTERS/Luc Gnago)

Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty

Women mourn the death of two relatives killed in the 5th district neighborhood of Bangui on February 9th. At least 10 people were reportedly killed the previous night and many buildings were burned and looted after violence broke out in the district. The International Criminal Court in the Hague said on February 7 it had opened an initial probe into war crimes in the Central African Republic. (AFP PHOTO/ ISSOUF SANOGO/Getty Images)

Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty

A shoe is pictured near dead bodies in a petrol tank in a former military camp used by ex-rebels in Bangui, on February 13, 2014. The head of the UN's refugee agency said today he had witnessed "a humanitarian catastrophe of unspeakable proportions" during his visit to the Central African Republic. (FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)

Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty

A wounded woman waits to be taken to a hospital in Bangui. The interim prime minister of the Central African Republic met on February 16 with leaders of the mainly Christian "anti-balaka" militias, some of whom say they are "ready to cooperate." (FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)

Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty

A cargo aircraft lands at the Mpoko Airport in Bangui, Central African Republic, on February 14, 2014. The UN food agency launched one of its largest-ever emergency food airlifts last week, flying in supplies to the wartorn country. (FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)

Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty

Young men take part in the destruction of houses in the PK5 neighborhood of Bangui, Central African Republic, on February 17th. Troops from several EU countries will begin deploying in the country next month, according to a French official. (FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)

Luc Gnago/Reuters

Muslims gather at a camp for displaced people at Mpoko international airport in Bangui, as they wait to leave the capital. (REUTERS/Luc Gnago)

Siegfried Modola/Reuters

A woman reacts to the death of her sister, who was killed during one of the latest incidents of sectarian violence in the 5th Arrondissement of Bangui. (REUTERS/Siegfried Modola)

WARNING: the image on the next slide depicts graphic violence in the Central African Republic.

Siegfried Modola/Reuters

A man drags the corpse of a victim, who was killed after he was accused of joining the ousted Seleka fighters on February 5th. The murdered man was killed minutes after the interim president of the Central African Republic, Catherine Samba-Panza, addressed the Central African Army Forces (FACA) asking for order to be restored after months of sectarian violence that has left thousands dead or homeless. (REUTERS/Siegfried Modola)

Siegfried Modola/Reuters

A woman is assisted after tear gas canisters were shot by African Union (AU) peacekeeping soldiers to disperse a crowd near the district of Miskine in the capital Bangui on February 7, 2014. (REUTERS/Siegfried Modola)

Luc Gnago/Reuters

A boy sits by the edges of a window in Bangui, February 17, 2014. (REUTERS/Luc Gnago)

Fred Dufour/AFP/Getty

People walk on a road lightened during an African Union-led operation in the Boy-rabe neighborhood of Bangui, Central African Republic, on February 15, 2014.  The international troops went house to house for about four hours in Bangui's Boy Rabe neighbourhood, the base of mostly Christian militias whose attacks have driven many minority Muslims from the city in recent weeks, sparking warnings of "ethnic cleansing". (FRED DUFOUR/AFP/Getty Images)