article

12.06.08

David Frost on Frost/Nixon

In a Daily Beast exclusive, broadcaster David Frost and the actor who plays him, Michael Sheen, talk about how he (they!) broke through Nixon's defenses, the truth about the drunken phone call and the most unexpected sequel to the interview.

Plus: Check out our Oscars page for more news on the awards, the nominees and the glam.

Plus, interviews with the former aide depicted in the film, Diane Sawyer, and the former girlfriend, played by Rebecca Hall, who was at Frost's side throughout, Caroline Graham.

The man who famously broke Richard Nixon in 1977 was a young British television personality, and we see him do it in the riveting new movie Frost/Nixon. Well, we see Michael Sheen doing it, playing the brash interviewer David Frost to Frank Langella’s slippery Richard Nixon. How did Frost get under Nixon’s skin—and how did Sheen get under Frost’s?

Sheen is the brilliant chameleon who was British Prime Minister Tony Blair in The Queen and The Deal, and Mozart in the London stage revival of Amadeus. The Daily Beast got the real Michael Sheen together with the real David Frost, to explore what they thought of each other’s performance. Harold Evans moderated. An audio version and highlights from the conversation are below.

Click Below To Hear Highlights of the Interview

Video screenshot


Powered by blogtalkradio

Sheen and Frost on getting Nixon to fess up:

Frost: John Burt said to me, ‘You’ve got to do that physical thing you do. I don’t know how to describe it, but you’ve got to do that physical thing of taking control of the interview physically.’ And that is one of the things you have got to do, particularly when you’re forcing points home. It’s a body language point. It’s a leaning forward point. It’s getting a little closer to the subject and so on. And that was key to the first day, the first two hours, when he in fact wouldn’t admit to anything. The second day he started to admit to mistakes for the first time. And then it was a question of pushing him further and further. But the body language comes into it as well as the words... Yes, Michael caught that perfectly.

Sheen: It’s funny because I’ve not heard Sir David talk about the body language before, but it’s something that I
That’s exactly what I was trying to do. You can physically dominate someone without jumping all over them. You can physicalize your desire to probe and to confront and not allow someone to wriggle out of things. And that was something I definitely tried to do in that interview.

Nixon's rambling drunken phone call. Did it happen?

Frost: No, it didn’t. That was one of the bits of fiction. There’s 10 or 12 percent fiction in the piece and that’s one of them. That, I think is absolutely brilliant character study of  Richard Nixon.

On Sheen's performance as Frost:

Frost: You can’t do an impersonation in a drama that lasts two hours, it would kill the drama, if you had the most brilliant impersonator doing funny lines, it would destroy the drama. So what Michael had to do, I think, was to base it on me, but to create a character that he has created around me, but not an impersonation.

Sheen: I based the character around you. That’s exactly what I did. It’s not an impersonation of you, but obviously, it refers to you. So it’s a character that I based around you… An audience can only handle an impersonation for maybe a minute or two.

Plus: Diane Sawyer talks about working for Nixon and what the movie gets wrong and read a Q&A with Caroline Graham (played by actress Rebecca Hall) about her romance with David Frost.

On Nixon behind the scenes:

Frost: He was very reserved then. Nixon was always affable but I always felt—when you talk about armor—that Nixon had in a way built a screen around himself to screen himself from a closeness with other people… extraordinary for a such an extraordinary politician that he never worked on his small talk.

Nixon would be a bit nervous and not very vocal...before the interview in the green room, or wherever it was. But then when he got into the interview and the question interested him or absorbed him, then he would really come free.

And the only time I ever saw, I guess very few people have ever seen this because when I went to take my leave of him two of the programs had been broadcast, the other two we had finished editing and I was taking my leave of him… We went to take our leave and for 20 minutes for some reason, he was, a word you never hear about Nixon, he was carefree. Just for 20 minutes he was carefree. The clouds lifted, the reserve lifted. He took Caroline on a tour of San Clemente and said, ‘Brezhnev slept in that room. He was a great swordsman you know, the Russians are, you know.’ And then he said to Manolo, his batman, as it were. He said to him, ‘Manolo, get out the caviar the Shah sent us for Christmas. But before you go, do your impression of Henry Kissinger. Go on, do your, do your impression of Henry Kissinger.’ And this was a carefree Nixon that one had never seen. And then just towards the end of the conversation, the screen came down again and he was still affable, and so on, but he was no longer carefree.

Read the full transcript of the conversation between David Frost and Michael Sheen.


evans-michael-sheen-david-frost
Dave Allocca/AP (Dave Allocca)

Full Transcript of Harold Evans’ conversation with David Frost and Michael Sheen.

Evans: Hello, I’m Harry Evans, acting for The Daily Beast. Our guests are, Michael Sheen, alias David Frost in the riveting new movie Frost/Nixon, and David Frost, the man who in 1977 got ex-president Richard Nixon finally to admit to his great Watergate cover-up. Frank Langella plays Nixon and we fell like we’re watching history live as Sheen and Langella build up to the great moment when Nixon, having resisted confessing to anyone else, breaks down to a television personality. The moment made Frost famous and Nixon even more infamous.

Let’s go to Michael Sheen first of all.
How did you actually study David Frost? You Michael, have impersonated, or played may be a better word, Mozart, ex-Prime Minister Tony Blair, Caligula. We could start -- how do you study somebody like Frost? I don’t know how you could study Mozart and Caligula, but David, thank heavens is very much alive. How do you go about it?

Sheen: Well, when I played Mozart and Caligula, there’s not a huge amount of stuff that I could study in terms of what exactly they were like. But in the case of Sir David and ex Prime Minister Blair, they are very much alive and kicking…

Evans: Wait a minute; in what ways is Tony Blair, former Prime Minister of England like David Frost?

Sheen: Well they’re not very alike at all. The only thing that sort of makes them alike is that I played both of them, really.

Evans:  Oh, Ok.

Sheen: They’re both incredibly unique people. I suppose, if anything, the qualities that maybe they share, talking about Blair now and Sir David is that they are both very accessible people, very warm people. They’re both very good with people. They have an ease and a charm and a relaxation.

Evans: To get the full effect of the Frost charm, did you meet him personally before you read the script or during rehearsal?

Sheen: No, I never had the pleasure of meeting Sir David before I read the script. Then, once I was rehearsing, we decided that perhaps it would be a good idea to hold off meeting because at first I thought this is a great opportunity for me to actually meet someone I am going to be able play. But having talked about it, we decided that maybe it would be a good idea to hold off until I had done all the exploratory part of rehearsing because if you start to have a relationship with someone it can start to make you sort of resist exploring certain areas that the story demands.

Evans: Well, we’ll come back to that. I am going to ask David Frost now, how spooky is it seeing yourself played by somebody else? Is it very much like you, the younger Frost?

Frost: Well, I think it wasn’t so much spooky. I went to the third preview, which was the first time I’d seen it and met Michael afterwards and Michael explained that in fact on that occasion, since it was my first visit, the cast had not been told that I was there and in fact, Michael said to me on that occasion he didn’t understand why, but for the first 20 minutes, he thought the audience was slightly nervous, unlike the previous two nights. It was only towards the end of the play when he worked out that I was in the audience, that he understood the explanation. Whether they were nervous because they were thinking I might leap up and object or cheer or yell, or whatever, I don’t know. But in fact, Michael said it was only during the famous phone call when Michael is listening to the phone call, so he’s gazing out into the audience, while Frank, Nixon, is doing most of the talking, that he saw me in the back row.

Peter Kramer/APEvans: But that famous phone call never took place.

Frost: No, it didn’t. That was one of the bits of fiction. There’s 10 or 12 percent fiction in the piece and that’s one of them. That, I think is absolutely brilliant character study of  Richard Nixon and that 5 minutes – is it about 5 minutes, Michael?

Sheen: I think it’s probably about that in the film, yea.

Frost: I think that’s the most brilliant piece of writing. There are one or two fictional bits that I wasn’t mad about. But the overall piece is so terrifically strong, it’s marvelous. And that piece of fiction is just a brilliant piece of writing by Morgan.

Evans: Yes, I agree. Was there any aspect – Michael just brace yourself – was there any aspect of Michael’s rendition of you, David, as a persona that you either didn’t like or thought was wrong?

Frost:  No, I didn’t. I didn’t have any feelings like that - and I would say this if Michael wasn’t here – or he’s there not here. There wasn’t anytime I felt that. I thought he did a really good job. And as Michael was explaining then, it’s an intriguing thing that he had to do and indeed Frank had to do as Nixon, which is you can’t do an impersonation in a drama that lasts two hours, it would kill the drama, if you had the most brilliant impersonator doing funny lines, it would destroy the drama. So what Michael had to do, I think, was to base it on me, but to create a character that he has created around me, but not an impersonation – which wouldn’t have worked. And that was the subtlety of what he achieved.

Evans: It’s not an impersonation, Michael, I realize. You don’t regard yourself as an impersonator, right?

Sheen: No, what Sir David just said absolutely hit the nail on the head. I’ve never heard it described like that, but I will certainly describe it like that from now on, which is that I based the character around you. That’s exactly what I did. It’s not an impersonation of you, but obviously, it refers to you. So it’s a character that I based around you. That’s exactly right. Because you are absolutely right. An audience can only handle an impersonation for maybe a minute or two. An impersonation is all about drawing attention to the exterior of a character. Whereas to do a performance, you have to take the audience on a journey so it’s all about trying drawing attention to the interior of a character.

Evans:  In that of course, you had Frank Langella as Nixon. Let’s come back to David Frost. This is Harold Evans for The Daily Beast.  David Frost– Since you actually did sit opposite Nixon, as Michael Sheen so brilliantly portrays in that electric moment of television and did get an astounding confession from him. How did you feel the tension, the electricity, between Michael Sheen and Frank Langella was reflective of what happened between you and ex-president Nixon at that moment?

Frost: I though it was very well portrayed. I think in the piece, Peter Morgan has given, as the thing builds up, has given Nixon some very good funny lines and that’s the great thing about the piece really. It’s got the drama growing and growing until the end, but along the way it is entertaining as well, which is very important. As we reach the climax of the piece, I think the relationship between the two of them was very much the same way as it was in reality.

Evans: That’s amazing. Now, coming back to Michael Sheen playing David Frost in this wonderful movie Frost/Nixon. Michael
Did you know, was part of your absorbing David Frost, did you know that he wasn’t just a talk show host, in fact he was presented as rather lightweight. In fact it isn’t mentioned in the movie but he was already somebody who had exposed various villains on television by relentless questioning. Famous for getting David Irving to almost admit his admiration of Hitler was bogus and grilling the prime minister of Rhodesia to reveal his racism.

Sheen: Absolutely. My research went… I wanted to watch as much of David’s earlier career as much as I possibly could. I went back to That Was The Week That Was and the Frost Report all the sort of work that David had been doing, and subsequent interviews. One of my favorite interviews of David’s is when he interviewed Margaret Thatcher on TV AM about the sinking of the Belgrano, which I think is an absolutely extraordinary piece of interview.  But just going back in time, the steeliness and the absolute tenacity that Sir David shows in our story in getting these interviews done is there in evidence throughout his career. And that was something I wanted to draw on in my portrayal. For all the charm and the relaxation and the enjoyment of people in life, but underneath that there is a real steel and tenacity and determination that can flash out when he needs it. So my research took me throughout David’s career, but I more concentrated on the earlier period.

Full Transcript of Harold Evans’ conversation with David Frost and Michael Sheen.

Evans: Hello, I’m Harry Evans, acting for The Daily Beast. Our guests are, Michael Sheen, alias David Frost in the riveting new movie Frost/Nixon, and David Frost, the man who in 1977 got ex-president Richard Nixon finally to admit to his great Watergate cover-up. Frank Langella plays Nixon and we fell like we’re watching history live as Sheen and Langella build up to the great moment when Nixon, having resisted confessing to anyone else, breaks down to a television personality. The moment made Frost famous and Nixon even more infamous.

Let’s go to Michael Sheen first of all.
How did you actually study David Frost? You Michael, have impersonated, or played may be a better word, Mozart, ex-Prime Minister Tony Blair, Caligula. We could start -- how do you study somebody like Frost? I don’t know how you could study Mozart and Caligula, but David, thank heavens is very much alive. How do you go about it?

Sheen: Well, when I played Mozart and Caligula, there’s not a huge amount of stuff that I could study in terms of what exactly they were like. But in the case of Sir David and ex Prime Minister Blair, they are very much alive and kicking…

Evans: Wait a minute; in what ways is Tony Blair, former Prime Minister of England like David Frost?

Sheen: Well they’re not very alike at all. The only thing that sort of makes them alike is that I played both of them, really.

Evans:  Oh, Ok.

Sheen: They’re both incredibly unique people. I suppose, if anything, the qualities that maybe they share, talking about Blair now and Sir David is that they are both very accessible people, very warm people. They’re both very good with people. They have an ease and a charm and a relaxation.

Evans: To get the full effect of the Frost charm, did you meet him personally before you read the script or during rehearsal?

Sheen: No, I never had the pleasure of meeting Sir David before I read the script. Then, once I was rehearsing, we decided that perhaps it would be a good idea to hold off meeting because at first I thought this is a great opportunity for me to actually meet someone I am going to be able play. But having talked about it, we decided that maybe it would be a good idea to hold off until I had done all the exploratory part of rehearsing because if you start to have a relationship with someone it can start to make you sort of resist exploring certain areas that the story demands.

Evans: Well, we’ll come back to that. I am going to ask David Frost now, how spooky is it seeing yourself played by somebody else? Is it very much like you, the younger Frost?

Frost: Well, I think it wasn’t so much spooky. I went to the third preview, which was the first time I’d seen it and met Michael afterwards and Michael explained that in fact on that occasion, since it was my first visit, the cast had not been told that I was there and in fact, Michael said to me on that occasion he didn’t understand why, but for the first 20 minutes, he thought the audience was slightly nervous, unlike the previous two nights. It was only towards the end of the play when he worked out that I was in the audience, that he understood the explanation. Whether they were nervous because they were thinking I might leap up and object or cheer or yell, or whatever, I don’t know. But in fact, Michael said it was only during the famous phone call when Michael is listening to the phone call, so he’s gazing out into the audience, while Frank, Nixon, is doing most of the talking, that he saw me in the back row.

Evans: But that famous phone call never took place.

Frost: No, it didn’t. That was one of the bits of fiction. There’s 10 or 12 percent fiction in the piece and that’s one of them. That, I think is absolutely brilliant character study of  Richard Nixon and that 5 minutes – is it about 5 minutes, Michael?

Sheen: I think it’s probably about that in the film, yea.

Frost: I think that’s the most brilliant piece of writing. There are one or two fictional bits that I wasn’t mad about. But the overall piece is so terrifically strong, it’s marvelous. And that piece of fiction is just a brilliant piece of writing by Morgan.

Evans: Yes, I agree. Was there any aspect – Michael just brace yourself – was there any aspect of Michael’s rendition of you, David, as a persona that you either didn’t like or thought was wrong?

Frost:  No, I didn’t. I didn’t have any feelings like that - and I would say this if Michael wasn’t here – or he’s there not here. There wasn’t anytime I felt that. I thought he did a really good job. And as Michael was explaining then, it’s an intriguing thing that he had to do and indeed Frank had to do as Nixon, which is you can’t do an impersonation in a drama that lasts two hours, it would kill the drama, if you had the most brilliant impersonator doing funny lines, it would destroy the drama. So what Michael had to do, I think, was to base it on me, but to create a character that he has created around me, but not an impersonation – which wouldn’t have worked. And that was the subtlety of what he achieved.

Evans: It’s not an impersonation, Michael, I realize. You don’t regard yourself as an impersonator, right?

Sheen: No, what Sir David just said absolutely hit the nail on the head. I’ve never heard it described like that, but I will certainly describe it like that from now on, which is that I based the character around you. That’s exactly what I did. It’s not an impersonation of you, but obviously, it refers to you. So it’s a character that I based around you. That’s exactly right. Because you are absolutely right. An audience can only handle an impersonation for maybe a minute or two. An impersonation is all about drawing attention to the exterior of a character. Whereas to do a performance, you have to take the audience on a journey so it’s all about trying drawing attention to the interior of a character.

Evans:  In that of course, you had Frank Langella as Nixon. Let’s come back to David Frost. This is Harold Evans for The Daily Beast.  David Frost– Since you actually did sit opposite Nixon, as Michael Sheen so brilliantly portrays in that electric moment of television and did get an astounding confession from him. How did you feel the tension, the electricity, between Michael Sheen and Frank Langella was reflective of what happened between you and ex-president Nixon at that moment?

Frost: I though it was very well portrayed. I think in the piece, Peter Morgan has given, as the thing builds up, has given Nixon some very good funny lines and that’s the great thing about the piece really. It’s got the drama growing and growing until the end, but along the way it is entertaining as well, which is very important. As we reach the climax of the piece, I think the relationship between the two of them was very much the same way as it was in reality.

Evans: That’s amazing. Now, coming back to Michael Sheen playing David Frost in this wonderful movie Frost/Nixon. Michael
Did you know, was part of your absorbing David Frost, did you know that he wasn’t just a talk show host, in fact he was presented as rather lightweight. In fact it isn’t mentioned in the movie but he was already somebody who had exposed various villains on television by relentless questioning. Famous for getting David Irving to almost admit his admiration of Hitler was bogus and grilling the prime minister of Rhodesia to reveal his racism.

Sheen: Absolutely. My research went… I wanted to watch as much of David’s earlier career as much as I possibly could. I went back to That Was The Week That Was and the Frost Report all the sort of work that David had been doing, and subsequent interviews. One of my favorite interviews of David’s is when he interviewed Margaret Thatcher on TV AM about the sinking of the Belgrano, which I think is an absolutely extraordinary piece of interview.  But just going back in time, the steeliness and the absolute tenacity that Sir David shows in our story in getting these interviews done is there in evidence throughout his career. And that was something I wanted to draw on in my portrayal. For all the charm and the relaxation and the enjoyment of people in life, but underneath that there is a real steel and tenacity and determination that can flash out when he needs it. So my research took me throughout David’s career, but I more concentrated on the earlier period.

02---evans-michael-sheen-david-frost
Peter Kramer/AP (Peter Kramer)

03---evans-michael-sheen-david-frost
Peter Kramer/AP (Peter Kramer)

Evans: Well, Michael, how did you cope, managing to be Mozart in Amadeus since you never met Mozart, or at least I don’t think so.

Sheen: No, I never met Mozart. Of Course, you have more of a free hand with people in the more distant past. I wouldn’t consider that the same sort of research that I’ve done when playing Blair, or Sir David or Kenneth Williams, Brian Clough – any of these people. It demands a different kind of preparation.

Evans: As is happens, I was Nixon’s last publisher when I was president of Random House. He was always pretty impressive when I met him. When you were doing the interview, David, were you aware of just how thick skinned, how armored, he was like an armadillo? Had you met him before?

Frost: Yes, I had met him before. I interviewed him for a series called The Next President in 1968. But that was a short ten minute interview and so on and he was the candidate. He
had just moved in, we got into his offices in 450 Park Avenue, I think it was, slightly ahead of the furniture, but we managed to find a couple of chairs to sit on. And we did the interview there, which he referred to again towards the very end of the actual interviews in 1977. He was very reserved then. Nixon was always affable but I always felt – when you talk about armor – that Nixon had in a way built a screen around himself to screen himself from a closeness with other people.  And that’s one of the reasons, perhaps, why he never developed small talk at all, extraordinary for a such an extraordinary politician that he never worked on his small talk. He worked on everything else, but not on that. He was very affable all the way through.

And the interesting thing was, and this is absolute reverse of the situation usually, is that Nixon would be a bit nervous and not very vocal and not many words, not much small talk before the interview in the green room, or wherever it was. But then when he got into the interview and the question interested him or absorbed him, then he would really come free. Whereas sometimes, it’s the other way around. The person is very articulate before the interview and nervous in the interview. He was the other way around. It wasn’t a problem of getting him talking on the screen when he was interested in the question, the problem was talking to him before hand because he was so shy, in a way, shy in that way.

And the only time I ever saw, I guess very few people have ever seen this because when I went to take my leave of him two of the programs had been broadcast, the other two we had finished editing and I was taking my leave of him. He hadn’t seen the other two, obviously, because he didn’t have the right to see any of the programs until they were broadcast. But for about 20 minutes when Caroline, my girlfriend, who was featured in the film too. Played by Rebecca Hall. We went to take our leave and for 20 minutes for some reason, he was, a word you never hear about Nixon, he was carefree. Just for 20 minutes he was carefree. The clouds lifted, the reserve lifted. He took Caroline on a tour of San Clemente and said, ‘Brezhnev slept in that room. He was a great swordsman you know, the Russians are, you know.’


And then he said to Manolo, his batman, as it were. He said to him, ‘Manolo, get out the caviar the Shah sent us for Christmas. But before you go, do your impression of Henry Kissinger. Go on, do your, do your impression of Henry Kissinger.’ And this was a carefree Nixon that one had never seen. And then just towards the end of the conversation, the screen came down again and he was still affable, and so on, but he was no longer carefree.

Evans: That’s very interesting. Now, Michael, when you were interviewing Nixon, I mean Frank Langella, that was an amazingly convincing relationship between the two of you. Did you study Nixon as well as Sir David?

Sheen: Yeah, I did a bit of study of Nixon because, obviously, Sir David knew a lot about Nixon, so I needed to as well. I watched some documentaries and did some reading.  But, mainly we were about creating the right kind of relationship between me and Frank when we were performing. One of the things about Sir David  when he’s interviewing people, he is very respectful of them, but doesn’t let that get in the way of holding on and sticking there like a carrier of what he wants to find out. I enjoyed that combination of deference and the respect being paid to Nixon. But at the same time finding the frustration of dealing with a man who is very slippery and who can dodge around. And then eventually honing in and focusing in on what Sir David wanted to get at with him. And this bit of information that they had discovered that started the discombobulation process of Nixon – the stuff about Colson.

Evans:
Let’s go back to real life for a moment, friends. David Frost –Had you really prepared and expected Nixon to break down as he did. Were you on pins and disappointed with how the interviews had gone until that moment? Just how did you get that climatic moment?

Frost:  Well, one of the little bits of fiction I think really that exists because Peter wanted to build up me as the underdog as it were before the climax at the end. In fact, the first two or there sessions actually went rather well. And in fact, one of the key lines in the film about, ‘if the president does it, it’s not illegal.’ That came from one of the earlier tapes. That wasn’t really accurate, that was building up Frost the underdog. Do you build down an underdog? I don’t know.

Evans:
How did you get the break? You must have been at least a little anxious during the first sessions.

Frost:  The thing was the sessions, the Watergate session, which is one climatic, incredibly powerful scene in the film. They actually took two days, the taping of the Watergate sessions. And one knew from the word go, that one had to somehow seize control because although we got up to 6 hours in the Watergate that’s not a long time when you’ve got a lot of ground to cover. In fact, we ended up doing about 5 hours because we reached the climax after 5 hours. But basically, going into it, on the way down to the first of the two Watergate Sessions, John Burt said to me, ‘you’ve got to do that physical thing you do. I don’t know how to describe it, but you’ve got to do that physical thing of taking control of the interview physically.’ And that is one of the things you have got to do, particularly when you’re forcing points home. It’s a body language point. It’s a leaning forward point. It’s getting a little closer to the subject and so on. And that was key to the first day, the first two hours, when he in fact wouldn’t admit to anything. The second day he started to admit to mistakes for the first time. And then it was a question of pushing him further and further. But the body language comes into it as well as the words.

Evans: Michael Sheen, if I might may so, you actually did represent that moment extremely well.

Frost:  Yes, Michael caught that perfectly.

Evans: Michael – how did you catch the body language between the two so perfectly?

Sheen: It’s funny because I’ve not heard Sir David talk about the body language before, but it’s something that I -- That’s exactly what I was trying to do. You can physically dominate someone without jumping all over them. You can physicalize your desire to probe and to confront and not allow someone to wriggle out of things. And that was something I definitely tried to do in that interview.

Evans: Do either of you feel now or then, do you feel any warm residual sympathy – I did watching the movie, did you feel it for Richard Nixon?

Frost: Well, speaking personally - It was difficult at the time to use a word like sympathy because we were very aware of the fact there were 20 or 30 people who were in prison because of doing what Nixon wanted them to do, or asked them to do, or told them to do. And so, one had those people also in one’s mind. So one didn’t have sympathy, but one had a certain empathy with him as you realized again and again that he had so hoped – at the end of my book I described him at the end of the session as a fat (sad)  man that so wanted to be great. He wanted to be great, but his paranoia and the flaws in his character ruled it out. So in the end you did feel an empathy, but at the time you couldn’t feel sympathy because of his victims.

Sheen: I think that’s right. I think empathy is something it would be inhuman not to feel. We can all relate to the idea of wanting to be better than we actually are and being brought up against our own flaws. So it would be inhuman not to empathize when someone is displaying those qualities. But sympathizing, I think you’re right Sir David, is a slightly different thing. It is hard to sympathize when so many people have suffered because of one man’s actions.

Evans: Well I want to thank David Frost, i.e. Michael Sheen, and David Frost, i.e. David Frost, for that fascinating discussion between the two men, one of whom assumes the other’s personality so brilliantly in the Frost/Nixon movie. Just a thought – how could we compare what we see in this marvelous film with what really happened? Is the television encounter now available on a DVD or something, David?

Sheen: I would urge everyone to watch the actual interviews themselves.

Evans: 
Oh yeah, good point.

Frost:  That would be lovely because people are so excited and interested by the film and have wanted to see the original interviews, we are bringing out the original Watergate as a DVD, as Michael mentioned.

Evans:  That’s wonderful, when will that be out?

Frost:  That should be in the shops now.

Evans: Produced by Paradigm Productions or what?

Frost:  It is brought to you by those friendly folk at Paradigm Productions.

Evans: Before we go off, what a great moment it was when David Frost decided to put his own money down to get that interview and BBC was kind of nervous.

Frost:
It was tense and hairy at moments but well worth it.

Evans:
  Well thank you both of you on behalf of The Daily Beast and the Beast viewers.
We much appreciate the conversation.

Frost:  Thank you, Harry and good to hear you Michael.

Sheen:
And you, Sir David.