1. Green

    Algae Blooms Under Polar Ice

    TO GO WITH AFP STORY IN FRENCH BY SLIM ALLAGUI
(FILES) Aerial  view of the Ice glacier of Ilulissat, Greenland taken on July 3. 2009.  Greenland's Ilulissat glacier, which has become a symbol of climate change, has melted in dramatic proportion, lost 94 square kilometres (60 square miles) of surface area between 2001 and 2005 due to global warming, according to a US study published last year, has triggered an emergency calll by the Artic Council. In 2004 Ilulissat Icefjord was admitted onto UNESCO’s World Heritage List.                       AFP      PHOTO     SLIM  ALLAGUI/FILES (Photo credit should read Slim ALLAGUI/AFP/Getty Images)

    Slim Allagui, AFP / Getty Images

    Scientists in an international team said they have recorded the most intense algae bloom ever—and it was under the polar ice caps in the Arctic last summer. The findings have stunned researchers. "The water was completely green," Stanford University's Kevin Arrigo, leader of the international team that reported Thursday, said. "It was like pea soup." It turns out that first-year polar ice, which were long considered impenetrable to sunlight, can create ideal conditions for growing phytoplankton, the single-celled plants crucial to the Arctic food chain.

    Read it at Vancouver Sun