1. BYE, BIG BROTHER?

    NSA Domestic Spying May End

    Civil liberties activists hold a rally against surveillance of US citizens as US President Barack Obama is expected to announce reforms of the National Security Agency (NSA) at the Justice Department in Washington on January 17, 2014. Obama will announce plans to stop the NSA from hoarding hundreds of millions of telephone call records. The US surveillance programs was exposed by Edward Snowden.   AFP PHOTO/Nicholas KAMM        (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

    Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty

    White House lawyers have given President Obama four options for reining in the National Security Agency's controversial surveillance operations, sources close to the discussions told The Wall Street Journal. The options range from abolishing the domestic-spying program altogether to running it through telephone companies, who would keep the data and only turn it over to the NSA if a specific investigation was underway. Obama advisers have not come to an agreement on which of the four options to recommend, but the options of having Americans' phone data held by private phone companies or another government agency seem the most technically feasible, short of abolishing the program.

    Read it at The Wall Street Journal