1. STEAMY

    May Was Hottest on Record

    A man wearing an umbrella-shaped hat eats an ice cream in Beijing, May 21, 2014. According to the National Meteorological Center, the highest temperature in Beijing will climb to 33 degree centigrade on Wednesday and the city is going to welcome the summer heat earlier than usual.
  REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon (CHINA - Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT) - RTR3Q4R9

    Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

    According to NASA, the average global temperature for May was 1.38 degrees Fahrenheit above average, making it the hottest on record. And, these record highs come before El Niño, which is expected to hit this summer. The global average does not mean it was scorching everywhere—for instance, Texas had a colder-than-average May—but it is significant in terms of long-term temperatures. In addition to NASA, the Japan Meteorological Agency said that March, April, and May of 2014 were the warmest on record, dating back to 1891.

    Read it at Discover Magazine