Haiti Rebuilding Four Years After the Earthquake (PHOTOS)

RYOT

RYOT

Earlier this month marked the four-year anniversary of a devastating earthquake that left Haiti in ruins. The country is still rebuilding, and 150,000 people continue to live in temporary shelters in and around Port-au-Prince. But not all the scenes in the island nation are bleak. Veteran humanitarian workers David Darg and Bryn Mooser reconnected in the aftermath of the disaster, and spent three years working with reconstruction efforts while launching their organization, a news-action site and foundation called RYOT. In this photo, young girls study at the Artists for Peace and Justice School secondary school, which co-founder Mooser helped build. Here are more moments captured in post-quake Haiti by the RYOT team, spanning from 2011 to present day.

Artists for Peace and Justice

A ball flies through the air as a soccer game captures the attention of students at the Artists for Peace and Justice School secondary school, which educates 1,400 students in Port-au-Prince.

Artists for Peace and Justice

Getting kids into the classroom remains a hurdle for Haitians. Only half of all children get a primary education, and a mere 20 percent of them go on to secondary school.

Artists for Peace and Justice

Players race for the ball as uniformed students watch on the sidelines.

RYOT

Ile-a-vache, or "Cow Island," offers stunning rock formations and crystaline water off the coast of mainland Haiti. The eight-mile-long island has about 15,000 inhabitants.

RYOT

A waterfall flows into a serene cove. The small communities on the island are a contrast to the bustle of Haiti's big cities.

RYOT

Scantily clad bathers dip into a waterfall at Saut-d'Eau, a voodoo and Catholic pilgrimage site.

RYOT

A kid gets a piggyback in Cite Soleil, one of the most dangerous neighborhoods of Port-au-Prince. In the background, "RYOT" is graffittied on a wall.

RYOT

Locals walk by a crumbling building. Four years after the earthquake, shoddy reconstruction has left infrastructure in Port-au-Prince vulnerable.

Artists for Peace and Justice

Schoolkids in white uniforms with black trim sit in class at the Artists for Peace and Justice School.

RYOT

Mooser and Darg started Haiti's first little league baseball team, the Taberre Tigers, as a way for kids to stay out of trouble. Here, a member of the league throws a bat and a glance over his shoulder on the diamond. The two made an award-winning documentary about the effort called Baseball in the Time of Cholera.

RYOT

Blue Caribbean water laps the shore in Jacmel, a town in southern Haiti.