It’s All in the Face

Novak Djokovic, Sloane Stephens & More Outrageous Wimbledon Faces (PHOTOS)

Djokovic catching flies, Stephens’s determination, and more of the strangest faces from Wimbledon.

Getty (4)

Getty (4)

Joy, heartbreak, frustration, and just plain awkward—the Grand Slam tournament’s players can’t hide their emotions. From Djokovic catching flies to Stephens’s determination, see the strangest faces from Wimbledon.

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Novak Djokovic

Wimbledon’s No. 1 seed Novak Djokovic isn’t known for keeping his emotions in check. The 26-year-old Serbian is this year’s favorite to win the tournament, which he took back in 2011, but you wouldn’t know that from his emotions. When he plays, Djokovic’s personality and emotions are out on the court for all to see, and with his mouth open that wide, he better hope there are no insects around. This celebratory display followed his fourth-round victory over Tommy Haas, and if Djokovic makes it as far as he is expected to in the tournament, the quantity of these images is due to increase exponentially.

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Juan Martin Del Potro

Juan Martín del Potro, the upstart 2009 U.S. Open champion, is in the semis for the third time ever in a Grand Slam tournament. Eighth-seeded Del Potro is amongst the most talented players on the tour right now, so it should come as no surprise that a missed shot in his second-round match, which he went on to win, irked him. Caught in the moment, Del Potro shows off his tonsils as he expresses anger with himself.

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Andy Murray

Second-seeded Andy Murray is charged yearly with the task of carrying the entire United Kingdom’s Grand Slam hopes on his shoulders. After years of coming close, he finally got the monkey off his back in the 2012 U.S. Open, becoming the first British man since Fred Perry in 1936 to win a Grand Slam tournament. This Wimbledon reaction, from his five-set quarterfinal-match against Fernando Verdasco, seems to show frustration. He fought hard to stay alive in London, where the pressure is still on. While his win last September in New York quieted many of his critics, many still want to see the home-country hero take Wimbledon.

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Fernando Verdasco

Maybe Spain’s Fernando Verdasco should consider an offseason job as a contortionist. Though the 29-year-old lost to Andy Murray in the quarterfinals, he jumped out to a commanding two-set lead before losing control of the match. This shape is from his third-round victory over Ernests Gulbis.

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Kirsten Flipkens

Twentieth-seeded Kirsten Flipkens looks about as surprised as most tennis fans are that she has made it to the semis in a Grand Slam for the first time in her career this summer. She took down former Wimbledon champ Petra Kvitová in her quarterfinals match, generating this image and plenty of buzz en route to the semis.

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Sloane Stephens

Though the 20-year-old’s name has been thrown around as the next big thing for a few years now, she has made her name even more relevant in 2013. Sloane Stephens reached the semis in the Australian Open this year and lost in the quarters at Wimbledon to Marion Bartoli. But if there was a prize for faces that look like evil muscular rabbits, Stephens would win year after year.

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Sabine Lisicki

Despite being the 23rd seed, Sabine Lisicki managed to send overwhelming favorite Serena Williams home after the fourth round, before Lisicki herself was bested in the woman's final on Saturday. Lisicki plays a powerful brand of tennis, but even that cannot fully explain the victory over Williams, who has dominated the women’s tennis scene for a while now. It stumped many tennis watchers—and as she returns a shot in her quarterfinal match against Kaia Kanepi, Lisicki looks like she, too, is confused.

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Kaia Kanepi

Kaia Kanepi played in the quarterfinals of a Grand Slam for the fifth time in her career at Wimbledon this summer, but she fell in that match to Sabine Liscki. Though she didn’t make it far enough in the tournament to get that shiny trophy as a memory of this summer’s Wimbledon, she—and the public—will always have this face to think back on, from her fourth-round victory over Laura Robson.

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Marion Bartoli

Wimbledon champion Marion Bartoli grimaces as she returns a backhand in her fourth-round match against Karin Knapp. The Frenchwoman beat Knapp and went on to defeat Sloane Stephens in the quarterfinals, putting her on her way to win the whole tournament on Saturday.

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Roberta Vinci

Roberta Vinci, the 11th seed, had her second-straight fourth-round exit at Wimbledon this time at the hands of Li Na. Before bowing out, however, the 30-year-old Italian made sure to keep both eyes firmly on the ball, with palpable intensity, during one backhand return.