The Beatles: Never Been Seen Images by Henry Grossman

In photographer Henry Grossman’s new book Places I Remember, My Time with the Beatles, he shares over 1,000 private photographs of the fab four. See photos from his collection here.

(c) Henry Grossman

(c) Henry Grossman

Henry Grossman didn't make The Beatles pose for his shots. "I simpy watched," he says. As a trusted friend to the group from 1964 to 1968, the Life photographer gained unprecedented access into their lives—traveling around the world and snapping over 6,500 images, many still unseen. In his new book, Places I Remember: My Time With the Beatles, Grossman reveals over 1000 of those photos. In this image, he captured the band mid-recording session for what would come to be one of their greatest achievements: Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. See more photos here.

 

 

(c) Henry Grossman

While describing them as "witty, charming, and intelligent," Grossman's main adjective for The Beatles is "fun." In this image, Grossman captures John Lennon goofing around on a skateboard. "Every time I visited them I had so much fun. I don’t know how else to say it," says Grossman.

(c) Henry Grossman

When George Harrison first introduced Grossman to a sitar—an ancient Indian musicial instrument—he expressed his discontent that no one could teach him how to play it. Grossman suggested he hire someone from India to help. A few months later, the group was India-bound.

(c) Henry Grossman

Often, a stop at George Harrison's house would turn into a trip to John, Paul, and Ringo's as well. "They had never allowed a British photographer into their homes. I recognize now the specialness of it," Grossman says.  "At the time I just thought they were good hosts!" Here, the fab four are seen in front of Ringo's yard in 1967.

(c) Henry Grossman

Grossman credits his unobtrusive style as the reason he was able to shoot such candid images. "[I was] like a fly on the wall. I wasn’t imposing on them. I was tactful." In this image, he captures John and Paul singing in Austria in 1965.

(c) Henry Grossman

The Beatles invited Grossman to Abbey Road to watch their recording sessions of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. Grossman says he was overwhelmed with their musical genius. At one point, he describes George going into the engineers booth and pulling out things to change the sound. "They knew how to do all of that. It was extraordinary."

(c) Henry Grossman

Even outside the studio, The Beatles' musical prowess continued. One night, Grossman describes the men sitting around Paul at the piano singing and playing a song. "By the end of the night, I didn't even recognize it. It was the same song," he says. "They were making it up as they went along." In this image, he captures Lennon in his iconic Sgt. Pepper's costume.

(c) Henry Grossman

In one of Grossman's favorite images—which he nicknamed 'Hamlet'—he captured a quiet, introspective George Harrison. Grossman describes the accidental nature of the photo: "We were having breakfast together, all the guys, in Nassau. George came in, looking like he had just woken up, with his hair all messed up. I saw it as a picture, and had to take it."

(c) Henry Grossman

When asked if there was ever a goodbye with The Beatles, Grossman (pictured here with the band) says no. "It was always just 'See you later,'" he says. Probably smart—The Beatles said enough hello, goodbyes to last a lifetime.