The Hero Project

10.11.13

All the Best Hero Summit Coverage

From Tina Brown's opening talk with Sen. John McCain to a panel discussing the accomplishments of our newest generation of veterans, here are all the best stories from The Daily Beast's Hero Summit plus a highlight video of the most unforgettable moments.

TINA BROWN SPEAKS WITH JOHN MCCAIN

At The Daily Beast’s Hero Summit, Sen. John McCain tweaked Obama’s foreign policy, blaming U.S. policies for putting Egypt on the path to ‘insurgency and terrorism.’

Egypt is now returning to its dark days of military dictatorship and will face a new insurgency and terrorism—and President Obama’s policies have contributed to the downward path there, Sen. John McCain said Thursday.

“We’re going to suspend some aid but not other aid. What is the message to [Egyptian] General [Abdul Fattah] al-Sisi?” McCain asked during an interview with editor-in-chief Tina Brown at The Daily Beast’s Hero Summit, reacting to Wednesday’s news that the Obama administration decided after a lengthy review to stop some military deliveries to the Egyptian military as a response to its brutal crackdown on protestors and the Muslim Brotherhood. “We should abide by our rule of law. But we didn’t do that.” READ FULL STORY HERE

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Scott Henrichsen/The Daily Beast


BOB WOODWARD AND SEN. OLYMPIA SNOWE
ON THE MESS IN WASHINGTON

Isaacson, Woodward, and former Sen. Olympia Snowe diverged on the finer points of Obama’s congressional diplomacy, but they all agreed that the mess in Washington is worse than ever.

As conference panels go, this one could reasonably have taken up the wholeday: What’s Wrong With Washington?

Ah, where to begin…

As it happens, moderator Walter Isaacson, Aspen Institute chief and long-time watcher at the Washington Zoo, opened by lobbing former Republican Sen. Olympia Snowe , now of the Bipartisan Policy Center, a big ‘ol softball: “Are things today worse than they have ever been?”

Snowe’s unshocking response: “Absolutely.” READ FULL STORY HERE

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Scott Henrichsen/The Daily Beast


THE LATEST GREATEST GENERATION

Want to know what a group of military veterans looks like? Start with two women: one a member of Congress, one a medical student, both former enlisted soldiers with combat tours overseas. Then add a martial artist and ordained minister who is also an amputee diagnosed with PTSD and a teacher for at-risk youth, and round it out with a successful businessman at a major corporation. Together, they formed a picture of America’s incredibly diverse community of veterans.

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, the Congresswoman from Hawaii, joined former Army medic Kate Norley, disabled combat veteran Anthony Smith, and Carl M. Tegen, an executive at AT&T and a Gulf War veteran to participate in “Shattering Stereotypes: The New Veterans” a panel held in Washington D.C. at The Daily Beast’s Hero Summit. READ FULL STORY HERE

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Scott Henrichsen/The Daily Beast


CRISIS LEADERSHIP: WHEN RULES ARE MEANT TO BE BROKEN

While Congress fights over Obamacare, Colorado may be suffering an e-coli outbreak. Colorado Gov. Hickenlooper talks to the Lt. General who brought calm to New Orleans post-Katrina on how to lead during a crisis.

The key to crisis leadership is “break the rules, the rules were written for peacetime,” says Lt. General Russel L. Honoré, who brought calm to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina devastated the city in 2005. He remembered pilots telling him he had to create a manifest before they could evacuate people from the flooded areas. “We got guns, you don’t. Fly the damn planes,” Honoré told them.

“Rules will stop a recovery in its tracks,” he said, relating another story of people stranded at the airport and the authorities telling him they didn’t have the resources to process everybody. “Osama bin Laden was not in New Orleans,” he barked into the phone. “You’re looking for terrorists in all the wrong places.” READ FULL STORY HERE

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Scott Henrichsen/The Daily Beast


HOW HEROES ARE MADE

Is heroism defined on the battlefield, the home front—or in everyday life? Christopher Dickey reports from the Hero Summit on three different leaders’ definitions of a hero.

The question is deceptively simple: What makes a hero?

A four-star U.S. Marine general, a New York Times columnist, a Chinese immigrant author and a Nigerian novelist found different and remarkably subtle ways to define those qualities. But in every case their answers had more to do with a code to live by than with momentary glory on the battlefield.

Gen. John Allen, former commander of international forces in Afghanistan, quoted Lord Moran, a surgeon who served on the Western Front in World War I, where hundreds of thousands of men charged out of the trenches and to their deaths day after day, week after week, month after month. Their bravery lay not only in their desire to fight for their comrades and fear of shaming themselves. There was something more fundamental and long lasting. Allen quoted Lord Moran from memory: “If you know a man of character in peace, you will know a man of courage in war.” Heroism is about those people who are “willing to sacrifice everything for the principles they hold most dear,” said Allen. READ FULL STORY HERE

 

ONE VIDEO WITH ALL OF OUR FAVORITE MOMENTS FROM THE HERO SUMMIT. CHECK OUT ALL THE SUMMIT VIDEOS HERE.

Video screenshot